Poll: Overwhelming majority think Trump, Clinton will be nominees
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An overwhelming majority believes that Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpIvanka Trump pitches Goya Foods products on Twitter Sessions defends recusal: 'I leave elected office with my integrity intact' Former White House physician Ronny Jackson wins Texas runoff MORE and Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonDemocrat Dana Balter to face Rep. John Katko in NY House rematch GOP lawmaker: Don't believe polls showing Trump behind Biden Kyle Van De Water wins New York GOP primary to challenge Rep. Antonio Delgado MORE will be their respective parties' presidential nominees, a new national poll released Monday finds.

The CNN/ORC poll found that 84 percent of voters think Trump will win the GOP nomination and 85 percent believe that Clinton will clinch the Democratic nomination. The two are both front-runners in their races.

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While voters believe Trump and Clinton will square off in the general election, that doesn't necessarily translate into support. Fifty-one percent of the Democratic voters surveyed support Clinton and 49 percent of GOP voters back Trump.

Among Republicans, 25 percent of voters support Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzMJ Hegar wins Democratic battle to challenge John Cornyn The Hill's Campaign Report: Key races take shape in Alabama, Texas, Maine 5 key races to watch on Tuesday MORE, followed by 19 percent who back John Kasich. Trump’s support in the polls has been consistent since March. He also polls slightly higher among male voters.

On the Democratic side, 43 percent support Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden aspires to become America's auto-pen president Progressive Mondaire Jones wins NY primary to replace Nita Lowey OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden pledges carbon-free power by 2035 in T environment plan | Trump administration has been underestimating costs of carbon pollution, government watchdog finds | Trump to move forward with rollback of bedrock environmental law MORE. He’s polling 8 points behind Clinton, a gap that has remained the same since March.

The poll was conducted from April 28 to May 1 and surveyed 1,001 adults via phone. The breakdown includes 405 registered voters who are Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents and 406 registered voters who are Republicans and GOP-leaning independent voters.

The margin of error for both the Republican and Democratic voter samples was 5 points.