Poll: Overwhelming majority think Trump, Clinton will be nominees
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An overwhelming majority believes that Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpImpeachment? Not so fast without missing element of criminal intent Feds say marijuana ties could prevent immigrants from getting US citizenship Trump approval drops to 2019 low after Mueller report's release: poll MORE and Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonImpeachment? Not so fast without missing element of criminal intent Former Bush assistant: Mueller report makes Obama look 'just plain bad' Seth Rich's brother calls for those pushing conspiracy to 'take responsibility' MORE will be their respective parties' presidential nominees, a new national poll released Monday finds.

The CNN/ORC poll found that 84 percent of voters think Trump will win the GOP nomination and 85 percent believe that Clinton will clinch the Democratic nomination. The two are both front-runners in their races.

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While voters believe Trump and Clinton will square off in the general election, that doesn't necessarily translate into support. Fifty-one percent of the Democratic voters surveyed support Clinton and 49 percent of GOP voters back Trump.

Among Republicans, 25 percent of voters support Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzMichael Bennet declared cancer-free, paving way for possible 2020 run Booker, Harris have missed most Senate votes O'Rourke sweeps through Virginia looking to energize campaign MORE, followed by 19 percent who back John Kasich. Trump’s support in the polls has been consistent since March. He also polls slightly higher among male voters.

On the Democratic side, 43 percent support Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersResurfaced Buttigieg yearbook named him 'most likely to be president' On The Money: House Dem says marijuana banking bill will get vote in spring | Buttigieg joins striking Stop & Shop workers | US home construction slips in March | Uber gets B investment for self-driving cars Buttigieg joins striking Stop & Shop workers MORE. He’s polling 8 points behind Clinton, a gap that has remained the same since March.

The poll was conducted from April 28 to May 1 and surveyed 1,001 adults via phone. The breakdown includes 405 registered voters who are Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents and 406 registered voters who are Republicans and GOP-leaning independent voters.

The margin of error for both the Republican and Democratic voter samples was 5 points.