Poll: Overwhelming majority think Trump, Clinton will be nominees
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An overwhelming majority believes that Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpCuomo grilled by brother about running for president: 'No. no' Maxine Waters unleashes over Trump COVID-19 response: 'Stop congratulating yourself! You're a failure' Meadows resigns from Congress, heads to White House MORE and Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonJuan Williams: Mueller, one year on Biden tops Trump by 9 points in Fox News poll With VP pick, Biden can't play small ball in a long ball world MORE will be their respective parties' presidential nominees, a new national poll released Monday finds.

The CNN/ORC poll found that 84 percent of voters think Trump will win the GOP nomination and 85 percent believe that Clinton will clinch the Democratic nomination. The two are both front-runners in their races.

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While voters believe Trump and Clinton will square off in the general election, that doesn't necessarily translate into support. Fifty-one percent of the Democratic voters surveyed support Clinton and 49 percent of GOP voters back Trump.

Among Republicans, 25 percent of voters support Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzFlorida sheriff asks for new leads in disappearance of Carole Baskin's former husband after Netflix's 'Tiger King' drops Ted Cruz jokes about quarantine boredom, 'Tiger King' Trump faces mounting pressure to unleash Defense Production Act MORE, followed by 19 percent who back John Kasich. Trump’s support in the polls has been consistent since March. He also polls slightly higher among male voters.

On the Democratic side, 43 percent support Bernie SandersBernie SandersTop Democratic super PACs team up to boost Biden Poll: Biden leads Sanders by 22 points GE employees urge company to use laid-off workers to make ventilators MORE. He’s polling 8 points behind Clinton, a gap that has remained the same since March.

The poll was conducted from April 28 to May 1 and surveyed 1,001 adults via phone. The breakdown includes 405 registered voters who are Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents and 406 registered voters who are Republicans and GOP-leaning independent voters.

The margin of error for both the Republican and Democratic voter samples was 5 points.