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Progressives are urging Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenTrump says government to review 5M Kodak loan deal Michelle Obama supporters urge Biden to pick former first lady as running mate On The Money: Unemployment debate sparks GOP divisions | Pandemic reveals flaws of unemployment insurance programs | Survey finds nearly one-third of rehired workers laid off again MORE (D-Mass.) to stump in Iowa and New Hampshire for 2014 candidates, despite her reluctance to touch down in early primary states that would catapult her into the 2016 spotlight.

The liberal hero has increasingly become one of Democrats' top surrogates this cycle, all the while adamantly denying she has any presidential ambitions for two years from now. 

Warren has taken her message to a dozen states the year, including Oregon, Kentucky, Minnesota, Ohio and West Virginia. But she's left off both the Hawkeye and Granite states despite the fact that both are top GOP targets Democrats are defending. 

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Should Warren decide to hit the trail for Rep. Bruce BraleyBruce Lowell Braley2020 caucuses pose biggest challenge yet for Iowa's top pollster OPINION | Tax reform, not Trump-McConnell feuds, will make 2018 a win for GOP Ten years later, House Dems reunite and look forward MORE (D-Iowa) or incumbent Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: GoDaddy CEO Aman Bhutani says DC policymakers need to do more to support ventures and 'solo-preneurs'; Federal unemployment benefits expire as coronavirus deal-making deadlocks Overnight Defense: Pompeo pressed on move to pull troops from Germany | Panel abruptly scraps confirmation hearing | Trump meets family of slain soldier Shaheen, Chabot call for action on new round of PPP loans MORE (D-N.H.), she'd certainly fuel speculation that she's looking to lay the groundwork and build support for a presidential campaign in the early caucus and primary states.

So far, she has no plans to visit Iowa or New Hampshire, according to sources familiar with the matter. 

While Warren’s hesitancy to travel there may hinge on reluctance to stoke the 2016 fire, for Senate candidates her absence in those early states isn’t because she’s not wanted. 

One Democratic strategist told The Hill that insiders have been urging her in recent weeks to stump in Iowa and New Hampshire, despite the presidential attention that would come with it.

The freshman senator has consistently maintained that she is not running for president, despite liberals' increasingly urging her to challenge presumed-nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe Hill's Campaign Report: Even the Post Office is political now | Primary action tonight | Super PACS at war Should Biden consider a veteran for vice president? Biden leads Trump by nearly 40 points in California: poll MORE.

But as the GOP's chances to take the Senate have increased, and the open seat race in Iowa especially has moved to a toss-up, liberals are growing more vocal for Warren to step in. 

"Appearances be damned — she's got to go. She'd be an asset to them," griped Democratic strategist Nathan Ballard, a former spokesman for now-Secretary of State John KerryJohn Forbes KerryBudowsky: Trump October surprise could devastate GOP Hillicon Valley: Democrats request counterintelligence briefing | New pressure for election funding | Republicans urge retaliation against Chinese hackers National security leaders, advocacy groups urge Congress to send election funds to states MORE's failed 2004 presidential run.

"She should go," added Neil Sroka, communications director for the liberal Democracy For America.

"We wouldn't be surprised” about a Warren visit, predicted Stephanie Taylor, co-founder of the Progressive Change Campaign Committee (PCCC). 

Taylor said that PCCC has raised more than $1 million this campaign cycle from people "who are part of the Elizabeth Warren wing of the Democratic Party."

Though Warren hasn't appeared in Iowa or in New Hampshire, she has raised $298,000 for Shaheen and $41,000 for Braley. She hosted a Boston fundraiser in June for Shaheen and has also sent fundraising emails for both Braley and Shaheen. 

There’s no apparent campaign visit scheduled for Iowa or New Hampshire, and representatives for both Shaheen and Braley declined to directly answer whether or not she's been invited.

"Senator Warren is a champion for the middle class and working families and we appreciate her support," said Harrell Kirstein, a spokesman for Shaheen's campaign.

Warren spokeswoman Lacey Rose declined to comment.

Ballard said that should Warren decide to visit either state, she'll need to have a plan ready to deal with the presidential buzz.

"She's got to have a message ready about how this is not a presidential run — or at least come clean about her presidential ambitions," he said.

Polls have Braley in a tight race in Iowa with Republican state Sen. Joni Ernst in the race to succeed retiring Sen. Tom HarkinThomas (Tom) Richard HarkinErnst challenges Greenfield to six debates in Iowa Senate race Biden unveils disability rights plan: 'Your voices must be heard' Bottom line MORE (D). Meanwhile, Shaheen has a comfortable lead against Warren's political nemesis: Scott Brown, who was a GOP senator from Massachusetts until Warren beat him in 2012.

"While I understand politically she might want to avoid the back-and-forth of the, 'Will she or won't she run for president?' there's no doubt in my mind that it'd be a boon to those candidates," Sroka said. "But yeah, it'd no doubt drum up 2016 buzz, too."