Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyThe Memo: Rough road awaits any Trump rival in GOP primary Trump keeps tight grip on GOP The 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration MORE tried out a populist economic message before Republicans Friday, as he seriously considers another run at the White House.

According to multiple reports, the 2012 GOP standard-bearer told Republicans gathered in California that he is giving “serious consideration to the future,” with an eye towards trying yet again to win the presidency.

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While Romney’s critics painted him in 2012 as a wealthy elite who did not understand the middle class, the former Massachusetts governor struck a more populist tone Friday. With the economy gaining steam but wage gains still stagnant, Romney sought to tap in to lingering economic dissatisfaction.

“Under President Obama the rich have gotten richer, income inequality has gotten worse and there are more people in poverty in American than ever before,” Mr. Romney said, according to The New York Times.

Romney laid out three pillars for a potential new campaign, according to the Associated Press, which would focus on national security, providing more opportunity to the middle class, and “breaking the scourge of poverty.”

"It's a tragedy, a human tragedy, that the middle class in this country by and large doesn't believe that the future will be better than the past."

He also took a jab at Hillary Clinton, the former Secretary of State under Obama widely seen as the Democratic frontrunner.

“The results of the Barack Obama-Hillary Clinton foreign policy have been devastating,” he said, according to the Times.

Romney was often targeted by Democrats during his 2012 run for his wealth and time at the private equity firm Bain Capital. They argued that Romney’s background suggested he lacked sympathy or understanding for the lower class.

Romney’s campaign took a big hit when secretly recorded video showed him telling donors that he was not concerned about the 47 percent of Americans who do not pay income tax.

While he largely steered clear of his Mormon faith during the 2012 campaign, Romney’s remarks Friday also touched on his work within that church. He mentioned his work as a Mormon pastor, he said his wife, Ann, saw his faith-based work as part of his softer side.

“She’s seen me not just as a business guy and a political guy, but for over 10 years as you know I served as a pastor for a congregation,” he said, according to The Washington Post. “She’s seen me work with folks that are looking for better work and jobs and providing care for the sick and the elderly. She knows where my heart is.”

Romney’s consideration of another presidential run would come after failed attempts to become president in 2008 and 2012.

With President Obama heading out of office and Hillary Clinton widely viewed as the likely Democratic nominee, there have been a number of GOP hopefuls who have taken steps towards a White House run.

No front-runner has emerged yet among Republicans, as potential candidates like former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, and Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) begin to build a campaign infrastructure.