Ben Carson hires two national fundraisers
© Greg Nash

Dr. Ben CarsonBen CarsonGovernment indoctrination, whether 'critical' or 'patriotic,' is wrong Noem takes pledge to restore 'patriotic education' in schools Watchdog blames Puerto Rico hurricane relief delays on Trump-era bureaucracy MORE’s political team has hired two national fundraisers ahead of a potential run for president in 2016.

Carson’s campaign manager, Texas-based Terry Giles, announced Wednesday that Jeff Reeter, a Houston businessman, will serve as national finance chairman should Carson take the presidential plunge.

“In this role Mr. Reeter will work closely with other outstanding political fund raising professionals to assure that Dr. Carson's possible presidential campaign will be significantly well capitalized,” Giles said in an email.

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On Tuesday, Giles announced the hiring of Amy Pass, who would serve as national finance director to Carson’s potential presidential campaign. Pass served in the same role for former Speaker Newt Gingrich’s presidential campaign in 2012, and helped the Georgia Republican raise more than $52 million, according to Giles.

Reeter and Pass add to Carson’s growing political team. Last week, Carson hired Mike Murray, the president and CEO of TMA Direct, a direct marketing firm, to serve as a senior adviser.

Carson also has a leadership PAC that has collected millions of dollars and a movement to draft him as a candidate with a presence in all of Iowa’s 99 counties.

The former neurosurgeon is near the top of many national polls and could be a force in early-voting states like Iowa and South Carolina.

Still, many Republican strategists are skeptical that his campaign is built to compete for the long haul. The hiring of Reeter and Pass could allay some of those fears; they indicate Carson intends to expand his focus beyond grassroots fundraising where he excels.

“While I believe Dr. Carson will be second to none in grassroots fund raising, we are by no means willing to surrender to anyone regarding traditional approaches,” Giles said.