Voters see Hillary and Jeb as old hat

A majority of voters see 2016 frontrunners Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonJordan calls Pelosi accusing Trump of bribery 'ridiculous' DOJ watchdog won't let witnesses submit written feedback on investigation into Russia probe: report What are Republicans going to do after Donald Trump leaves office? MORE (D) and former Fla. Gov. Jeb Bush (R) as a “return to the policies of the past,” according to a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll that shows the potential perils for each party’s biggest names. 

Fifty one percent of registered voters view Clinton’s policies as retreads of the past, but she’s viewed much more favorably with Democrats. Only twenty three percent hold that view, and 73 percent believe she’ll provide “new ideas for the future.” 

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Bush’s numbers aren’t as strong. Sixty percent of registered voters, and 42 percent of Republicans, see his policies as leaning backwards. 

Bush has been criticized by some conservatives for his support of Common Core education standards and for a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants. Both policies got poor marks from Republicans in the voters, as more than half of them view those positions unfavorably. 

Recently, Bush has said he only supports a pathway to legal status, but has expressed support for a pathway to citizenship in the past. 

The poll also showed largely positive perceptions of Gov. Scott Walker (R-Wis.) and Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioGOP senators plan to tune out impeachment week Republicans warn election results are 'wake-up call' for Trump Paul's demand to out whistleblower rankles GOP colleagues MORE (R-Fla.). Fifty three percent of voters said they could back Walker, compared to only 17 percent that said they could not. Fifty six percent said they could support Rubio, while 26 percent could not. 

Those two candidates sported the largest margins of potential support. Bush had only seven percentage points between those who said they could support him and those who couldn’t. Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpButtigieg surges ahead of Iowa caucuses Biden leads among Latino Democrats in Texas, California Kavanaugh hailed by conservative gathering in first public speech since confirmation MORE, Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP eager for report on alleged FBI surveillance abuse Johnson opens door to subpoenaing whistleblower, Schiff, Bidens Overnight Defense: Erdoğan gets earful from GOP senators | Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract decision in court | Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families MORE (R-S.C.) and Gov. Chris Christie (R-N.J.) all had significantly more voters say they could not back them. 

Clinton fared much better with Democrats, as 86 percent said they could see themselves voting for her, leaps and bounds ahead of the potential support for Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenButtigieg surges ahead of Iowa caucuses Biden leads among Latino Democrats in Texas, California Following school shooting, Biden speaks out: 'We have to protect these kids' MORE (D-Mass.) and Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenButtigieg surges ahead of Iowa caucuses GOP eager for report on alleged FBI surveillance abuse Biden leads among Latino Democrats in Texas, California MORE. And more than half of those Democratic voters said they don’t care whether Clinton receives a coronation or a contested primary. 

The poll surveyed 1,000 adults and has an overall margin of error of 3.1 percent. The Democratic primary sample has a 6.1 percentage point margin, and the GOP primary sample has a 6.5 percentage point margin.