New allegations leveled against Christie
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A former ally of Gov. Chris Christie (R-N.J.) is accusing the possible presidential candidate of illegally disclosing grand jury information as part of the “Bridgegate” investigation, according to The New York Times.

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David Wildstein has already pleaded guilty to conspiracy charges related to the bridge closure and said the plan was politically motivated. Christie's former deputy chief of staff, Bridget Anne Kelly, and Bill Baroni, another Port Authority appointee, have pleaded not guilty and will face trial later this summer.The statement alleges that Christie met in 2010 with Wildstein, Baroni and others to talk about a change at the top of the Port Authority, the newspaper reported. During that meeting, Christie allegedly told the group to fire the current deputy superintendent of the Port Authority, Arthur Cifelli, in order to appoint a Democrat to replace him. That Democrat, Jerry Speziale, had been a three-term county sheriff and would likely have won reelection.Wildstein's statement alleges that Christie made the moves to take Speziale out of the running for sheriff and help a Republican "win the post," according to the Times.Christie also allegedly told the group that Cifelli had committed perjury during a recent grand jury investigation. That disclosure would have been a violation of laws that bar Christie from confirming grand jury witnesses.Wildstein added that he can turn over emails and documents for further "inspection" into his claims, the newspaper reported.Kevin Roberts, a Christie spokesman, pushed back on the accusations in a statement to the Times.“This is just the latest legal jockeying in yet another legal proceeding involving Mr. Wildstein, but one thing should be made clear: Anyone suggesting the governor disclosed grand jury information is either lying or mistaken," he said.Christie has been dogged by the "Bridgegate" allegations for years, and the case has simmered back up to the surface as he weighs a presidential bid in 2016. The governor has repeatedly pointed out that the investigation has found no evidence that he knew about the plot, but the impending trial, set to begin just months before the Iowa caucuses, threatens to complicate his potential bid for president.