Poll: Trump adds to lead over GOP field
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Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrumps light 97th annual National Christmas Tree Trump to hold campaign rally in Michigan 'Don't mess with Mama': Pelosi's daughter tweets support following press conference comments MORE is widening his lead over the GOP’s 2016 presidential field despite concerns over his electability, according to a new poll.

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The latest Quinnipiac sampling released on Thursday shows Trump dominating the other Republican White House hopefuls with 28 percent voter support among Republican and Republican-leaning respondents.

Quinnipiac said that result is the New York business mogul’s highest score from GOP voters of the 2016 race thus far.

Ben Carson is the only other GOP candidate earning double-digit support, pollsters found. The retired neurosurgeon trails Trump with 12 percent voter support from GOP voters.

Quinnipiac said that former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, Sen. Ted Cruz (Texas) and Sen. Marco Rubio (Fla.) follow, tying one another at 7 percent.

No other GOP candidate surpasses 6 percent, it said. Quinnipiac added that 11 percent of Republican voters are undecided on whose GOP Oval Office bid they are supporting next year.

Trump’s high scores are not without problems for his surging 2016 campaign, however.

Quinnipiac found that 26 percent of GOP voters say that the outspoken billionaire tops their “no way” list on ballots next year.

Bush is next, Quinnipiac added, with 18 percent of those voters rejecting his 2016 White House run.

Trump also received low marks from all on his honesty and trustworthiness, Quinnipiac said.

It said that 54 percent of all voters said he has neither of those attributes, versus 38 percent who said the reality television star has both.

Quinnipiac also found that the word most associated with Trump is “arrogant,” another sign voters may have reservations about his candidacy.

It surveyed 1,563 registered voters from Aug. 20-25 over landlines and cellphones with a 2.5 percent margin of error. Its latest sampling includes 666 Republicans with a 3.8 percent margin of error.

--This report was updated at 8:00 a.m.