Perry loses New Hampshire staff
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Former Texas Gov. Rick PerryJames (Rick) Richard PerrySenior Trump administration official to leave post next week Overnight Energy: Trump doesn't mention climate change in speech touting environmental policies | Green groups fight EPA's new FOIA rule | Trump emissions rollback hit with legal challenge Trump touts environmental policies, but says nothing of climate change MORE has no more staff on the payroll in the first-in-the-nation primary state of New Hampshire.

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In an interview with WMUR on Wednesday, Michael Dennehy, formerly a senior strategist for Perry in the Granite State, said he had not been paid by the campaign since June.

Dennehy, a veteran of Arizona Sen. John McCain’s presidential campaigns, told WMUR that he still supports Perry but that “the campaign is broke.”

Perry's last visited New Hampshire on Aug. 3.

Dennehy said that he still fully supports Perry for president and would be available to serve in an advisory role in the future.

"I remain Governor Perry’s strongest supporter and advocate in New Hampshire," he said in a statement to The Hill. "There are no plans for him to campaign here, however, if he ever needs me for something I stand ready to assist. I will continue to spread the message that Governor Perry is the best qualified, most experienced candidate and the only one who truly connects with middles class America.”

The news comes a day after Perry’s political director in New Hampshire, Dante Vitagliano, left to join Ohio Gov. John Kasich’s presidential campaign. WMUR reports that a third former Perry staffer in New Hampshire left the campaign recently for a job at the Republican National Committee.

The former Texas governor has experienced a similar dissolution of his campaign team in Iowa after fundraising woes forced him to stop paying staffers there as well.

Perry once had nearly a dozen staffers in the Hawkeye State, but has lost both of his Iowa co-chairmen to other campaigns and is believed to be down to only a handful of paid workers in the state. 

Lucy Nashed, a spokesperson for the campaign, declined to answer a question about whether Perry’s South Carolina team has held together. However, she said Perry intends to compete in the carve-out states where he has suffered set-backs. 

“Gov. Perry continues to travel the country sharing his optimistic vision for the future of the country and his proven record of success, and he continues to focus on competing in the early states,” Nashed said. “Whether it’s his time serving as governor of the 12th largest economy in the world, stepping in when Washington D.C. failed to secure our border, or serving our country in the U.S. Air Force, Gov. Perry’s record is unmatched by any other candidate in the field.”

Perry has struggled to gain traction in the crowded Republican field. He is polling at just above 1 percent in the RealClearPolitics average, and will likely be consigned once again to the debate for lower-tier candidates later this month. 

Despite his campaign’s money woes, a trio of super-PACs supporting his candidacy remain flush with cash, having raised a combined $17 million in the second quarter.