Poll: Trump tops GOP field in California
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Billionaire Donald TrumpDonald TrumpMaria Bartiromo defends reporting: 'Keep trashing me, I'll keep telling the truth' The Memo: The center strikes back Republicans eye Nashville crack-up to gain House seat MORE leads the crowded 2016 Republican presidential field in California, according to a poll released Sunday morning.

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The USC Dornsife/LA Times Poll found that 24 percent of Republicans said they would support Trump.

Retired pediatric neurosurgeon Ben CarsonBen CarsonGovernment indoctrination, whether 'critical' or 'patriotic,' is wrong Noem takes pledge to restore 'patriotic education' in schools Watchdog blames Puerto Rico hurricane relief delays on Trump-era bureaucracy MORE is in second place with 18 percent.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzWhite House denies pausing military aid package to Ukraine Ted Cruz says critical race theory is as racist as 'Klansmen in white sheets' Pentagon pulling 'certain forces and capabilities,' including air defenses, from Middle East MORE (Texas) each received 6 percent support.

Pollsters found that Carson would beat Trump in a head-to-head matchup, however, 43 percent to 32 percent.

"More than half of the Republican primary voters who have chosen a candidate are supporting someone who has never held elected office," Dan Schnur, director of the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll and director of the Unruh Institute of Politics of USC, said.

"Sheer anger toward Washington is handily defeating ideology in the Republican primary," he added.

Pollsters also found former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe Memo: The center strikes back Democratic clamor grows for select committee on Jan. 6 attack White House denies pausing military aid package to Ukraine MORE atop the Democratic field, with 42 percent support.

Twenty six percent said they would back Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Memo: The center strikes back Sanders against infrastructure deal with more gas taxes, electric vehicle fees Sunday shows - Voting rights, infrastructure in the spotlight MORE (I-Vt.).

Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenExpanding child tax credit could lift 4 million children out of poverty: analysis Maria Bartiromo defends reporting: 'Keep trashing me, I'll keep telling the truth' The Memo: The center strikes back MORE grabbed support from 11 percent of respondents when his name was added to the field.

"Clinton is holding up pretty well," said Drew Lieberman, vice president of Democratic polling firm Greenberg Quinlan Rosner, which helped conduct the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll. "What you see going on here is that she has very solid coalition of moderate-type Democrats plus non-white voters that someone like Sanders or anybody from her left flank would have to overcome in order to cut into her vote share."