Rubio’s endorsement roll continues
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Rep. Kristi Noem (R-S.D.) endorsed Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioNikki Haley: New York Times ‘knew the facts’ about curtains and still released story March For Our Lives founder leaves group, says he regrets trying to 'embarrass' Rubio Rubio unloads on Turkish chef for 'feasting' Venezuela's Maduro: 'I got pissed' MORE (R-Fla.) for president on Friday, giving the Florida Republican his fourth Congressional endorsement in as many days.

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Noem lauded Rubio as a “next-generation conservative leader that puts our party in the best position to win back the White House,” and said he stands above the crowded field of GOP contenders for his “ability to articulate a conservative vision for what kind of country we can become in this new American century.”

"As the son of a bartender and a maid, he possesses a personal understanding of the challenges facing hardworking taxpayers in South Dakota and across the country, and he has conservative solutions to help address today's most pressing problems," Noem said in a statement.

It’s the latest sign that establishment Republicans are gravitating towards Rubio.

Last week, Rubio won the backing of influential Republican billionaire Paul Singer over former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush.

This week, Rubio surged into the lead for Senate endorsements, picking up support from Sens. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerSome employees' personal data revealed in State Department email breach: report Colorado governor sets up federal PAC before potential 2020 campaign Hillicon Valley: Trump signs off on sanctions for election meddlers | Russian hacker pleads guilty over botnet | Reddit bans QAnon forum | FCC delays review of T-Mobile, Sprint merger | EU approves controversial copyright law MORE (Colo.), Steve Daines (Mont.) and James Risch (Idaho). No one else has more than two senators supporting their candidacy.

Noem’s endorsement gives Rubio his 11th backer in the House, according to the FiveThirtyEight tracker.

That’s half as many as Bush, although many of Bush’s supporters in the House backed him at an early stage in the race, before his struggles on the campaign trail became apparent. Half of Bush’s House supporters are from Florida, where he has deeper political ties than Rubio from his time as governor.