Carson: ‘Very likely’ I’d be a one-term president
© Getty Images

Republican presidential candidate Ben CarsonBen CarsonRepublicans are the 21st-century Know-Nothing Party Sunday shows preview: Delta concerns prompt CDC mask update; bipartisan infrastructure bill to face challenges in Senate Government indoctrination, whether 'critical' or 'patriotic,' is wrong MORE on Wednesday suggested his policies would torpedo his chances at two terms in the Oval Office.

“You know, if I’m successful in this endeavor to become president of the United States, it’s very likely I would be a one-term president,” he said, according to The Wall Street Journal.

ADVERTISEMENT

“[It is] because there are some tough things we have to attack,” Carson added. "We cannot continue down this path.”

The retired neurosurgeon bemoaned the GOP base's impossibly high standards for its conservative credentials.

“Republicans have this mental disorder that says, ‘A person doesn’t agree with me 100 percent, I’m not with them, I’m going to go and sit down,’ ” Carson said during a campaign stop in Las Vegas.

“You know, I believe that was a disease that was implanted by the Democrats,” he quipped. "That’s what they want you to do. As long as you feel that way, they’ve got it in the bag.”

He made no mention of his performance in the GOP’s fifth presidential debate in Las Vegas the night before, the report said. Carson railed against the political establishment while speaking in Tuesday night’s contest.

“There’s a false narrative that only [a member of] the political class has the wisdom and the ability to be commander in chief,” Carson said.

“I don’t do a lot of talking. I do a lot of doing,” he added. "The fact of the mater is, look and see what I’ve done, and that speaks volumes about strength.”

Carson’s poll numbers are dropping following a renewed focus on national security in the 2016 race. The political neophyte has struggled with voter concerns that he lacks the foreign policy experience necessary for combating terrorism.

Carson ranks fourth in the GOP’s 2016 field, with 12 percent support nationally in the RealClearPolitics average of polls.

He trails Donald Trump by 21 points despite briefly edging past the GOP presidential front-runner earlier this year.