Trump ally launches super-PAC
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Controversial political consultant Roger Stone, who left Donald TrumpDonald TrumpFormer Sen. Heller to run for Nevada governor Overnight Defense & National Security — Milley becomes lightning rod Joint Chiefs Chairman Milley becomes lightning rod on right MORE’s campaign in August, has launched a super-PAC to support the GOP front-runner’s bid by taking aim at his rivals — Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Defense & National Security — Milley becomes lightning rod Joint Chiefs Chairman Milley becomes lightning rod on right GOP senators unveil bill designating Taliban as terrorist organization MORE in particular.

In an open letter on the website for the Committee to Restore America’s Greatness, Stone alleges that the Republican establishment seeks to take down Trump.

“The Washington, D.C. insiders, special interests, lobbyists and a handful of self-interested billionaires plan an all-out paid media assault to destroy the candidacy of Donald Trump,” Stone writes.

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He directs the bulk of his fire at Rubio, calling him a “boy-toy for billionaires” and claiming that the Florida senator, “backed by a number of high-powered billionaires, has entered into a secret alliance with Governor John Kasich of Ohio” to defeat Trump.

“So, there you have it,” Stone writes. “The RINOs (Republicans in Name Only), Rubio and Kasich, are teaming up for an expensive attack campaign in an attempt to destroy the candidacy of Donald Trump. Will you help us stop them?”

The Wall Street Journal first reported the news.

Stone is a colorful and enigmatic figure.

He flaunts his decadent lifestyle, and has claimed credit for contributing to the demise of former New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer’s demise, saying he provided key information to the FBI about Spitzer’s prostitution scandal.

He has also worked for the campaigns of former Presidents Reagan and Nixon. 

Stone and Trump appear to have a combustible relationship.

“Roger is a stone-cold loser,” Trump told The New Yorker in 2008. “He always tries taking credit for things he never did.”

But Stone worked as an adviser to Trump’s campaign earlier this year, before leaving under odd circumstances.

Trump has so far made a point of rejecting the help of super-PACs, arguing that he’s the only candidate not benefiting from the support of outside groups and claiming that because he’s self-funding his campaign, he’s the only one not beholden to special interests.

The super-PAC seeks a way around this.

“We are only accepting contributions from individuals,” the group’s website states. “Any corporate or business contributions will be returned.”

A phone call to the Trump campaign has not been returned.