Poll: Trump presidency would embarrass half of Americans
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Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpWHCA calls on Trump to denounce video depicting him shooting media outlets Video of fake Trump shooting members of media shown at his Miami resort: report Trump hits Fox News's Chris Wallace over Ukraine coverage MORE maintains his lead among the GOP field, but half of Americans would be embarrassed to have the real estate mogul as president, a new poll found.

A Quinnipiac University poll released Tuesday shows Trump leading his next nearest opponent, Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzCruz: 'Of course' it's not appropriate to ask China to investigate Bidens Sunday Show Preview: Trump's allies and administration defend decision on Syria O'Rourke raises .5 million in third quarter MORE (R-Texas) at 28 to 24 percent, but the Republican presidential front-runner trails behind both major Democratic hopefuls in the general election.

While half of all polled would be embarrassed to have Trump as president, the majority of that sentiment comes from Democrats and independent voters.

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For Republicans, 44 percent would be proud to have Trump in the White House, twice as much as GOP voters who would be embarrassed. Only 4 percent of Democrats and 20 percent of independents would be proud to having Trump be president.

The poll also shows that only 41 percent of those polled think he has a "good chance" of beating the Democratic nominee, though again, the attitudes run along party lines: Among Republicans, 70 percent think he has a good chance; among Democrats, 14 percent think he stands a good chance, while Trump fares better among independents, 40 percent of whom think he can beat the Democratic nominee.

“Half of American voters say they’d be embarrassed to have Donald Trump as their Commander in Chief and most Americans think he doesn’t have a good chance in November, but there he is still at the top of the Republican heap,” Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Poll, said in a release.

Following Trump and Cruz among the Republican candidates are Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioFurious Republicans prepare to rebuke Trump on Syria Five ways Trump's Syria decision spells trouble Rubio criticizes Warren response on same-sex marriage opposition as condescending MORE (R-Fla.), lagging behind in third place with 12 percent, and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, who received 10 percent. None of the remaining candidates registers above 6 percent.

Among voters of all parties polled, 59 percent think Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonVideo of fake Trump shooting members of media shown at his Miami resort: report Ronan Farrow exposes how the media protect the powerful Kamala Harris to Trump Jr.: 'You wouldn't know a joke if one raised you' MORE has a good chance of beating the Republican nominee, with a majority of Democrats and independents believing that, while 36 percent of Republicans polled agree.

But it won't be easy for her, the poll finds. In hypothetical general election match-ups, Clinton topples Trump, 47 to 40 percent, while narrowly edging out Rubio by 1 point and tying Cruz. Her Democratic rival, Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders wishes Ocasio-Cortez happy birthday Video of fake Trump shooting members of media shown at his Miami resort: report Sanders can gain ground by zeroing in on corruption MORE (I-Vt.), also defeats Trump, 51 to 38 percent, but falls short to both Rubio by 3 points and Cruz by 1.

“Hillary Clinton tops him," Malloy said of Trump. "Sen. Bernie Sanders hammers him and Sen. Ted Cruz is snapping at his heels. Can a candidate that half the American electorate thinks is an embarrassment win in November?” 

On the Democratic side, Clinton easily leads Sanders, 61 to 30 percent, with former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley in a distant third with 2 percent. 

The poll was conducted from Dec. 16 to Dec. 20 and surveyed 1,140 registered voters via landline and cellphone. The margin of error was 2.9 percentage points. In the breakdown, the poll surveyed 508 GOP voters with a margin of error of 4.4 percentage points, and 462 Democratic voters with a margin of error of 4.6 percentage points.