Trump: I'll work with Democrats
© Getty

Republican presidential candidate Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrats slide in battle for Senate Trump believes Kushner relationship with Saudi crown prince a liability: report Christine Blasey Ford to be honored by Palo Alto City Council MORE is stressing his bona fides as a dealmaker who'd be able to enter the White House and work with congressional Democrats to hammer out agreements.

ADVERTISEMENT

"I think I'm going to be able to get along with Pelosi — I've always had a good relationship with Nancy Pelosi," Trump said Tuesday on MSNBC's "Morning Joe," referring to the House minority leader.

"Reid's going to be gone. I've always had a decent relationship with Reid," Trump said, referring to Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidFive takeaways from testy Heller-Rosen debate in Nevada Major overhauls needed to ensure a violent revolution remains fictional Senate heads home to campaign after deal on Trump nominees MORE (D-Nev.), the Senate minority leader. "I always had a great relationship with Harry Reid."

Trump said he thought he'd get along with "just about everybody," including Sen. Chuck SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerThe Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Health care a top policy message in fall campaigns McConnell says deficits 'not a Republican problem' Medicare for All is disastrous for American seniors and taxpayers MORE (D-N.Y.), likely to be the next Senate Democratic leader, who Trump said he was "close to ... in many in ways."

The real estate mogul is targeting GOP rival Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzDemocrats slide in battle for Senate O'Rourke's rise raises hopes for Texas Dems down ballot Election Countdown: Small-donor donations explode | Russian woman charged with midterm interference | Takeaways from North Dakota Senate debate | O'Rourke gives 'definitive no' to 2020 run | Dems hope Latino voters turn Arizona blue MORE, against whom Trump is running neck and neck in Iowa a week out from the state's caucuses. Trump argues that the Texas senator won't work with others in Congress and that while both candidates have positioned themselves as political outsiders, Trump argues even Republicans don't want Cruz.

"He is a guy that nobody likes and nobody trusts," Trump said on MSNBC before reiterating that Cruz "is a nasty guy, he says things that are very nasty, so I have to be nastier than him and it's just one of those things."

"I've been in politics all my life, I've been dealing with politicians all my life," Trump said of whether he would have any friends in Congress.

The pivot to stress his ability to work with Democrats in Congress comes as Trump continues to dominate in polls nationally and in New Hampshire, which hosts its primary Feb. 9, eight days after Iowa.

Trump has argued that establishment Republicans are warming to his potential presidency because they are scared of Cruz getting into the White House.

Still, Trump was thrown on the defensive Tuesday by a pair of Cruz's ads released in the past week hitting Trump on eminent domain and bashing the businessman for calling the people of Iowa "stupid."

"He's just saying lie after lie, it's not becoming," Trump said on ABC's "Good Morning America."

During that interview, when pressed on whether one could assume Trump would show up at the Fox News debate Thursday night, Trump told ABC, "You can probably make that assumption, but I'm thinking about it."

During the MSNBC interview, Trump also teased rolling out a "very powerful endorsement" Tuesday. He was backed by 2008 Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin last week and "Duck Dynasty" star Willie Robertson.