Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush had to ask his audience to clap during a speech at a campaign stop in New Hampshire on Tuesday.

Bush had just finished talking about how he would protect the country as commander in chief, The New York Times reported.

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"I think the next president needs to be a lot quieter, but send a signal that we're prepared to act in the national security interests of this country to get back in business of creating a more peaceful world," he said.

The audience responded with silence.

"Please clap," Bush then said, in a quieter tone, and the crowd laughed and obliged.

Bush is in fifth, with 9.8 percent support, behind Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpHouse panel approves 0.5B defense policy bill House panel votes against curtailing Insurrection Act powers after heated debate House panel votes to constrain Afghan drawdown, ask for assessment on 'incentives' to attack US troops MORE, Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzTrump administration grants funding extension for Texas testing sites Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill banning federal government use of facial recognition tech | House lawmakers roll out legislation to establish national cyber director | Top federal IT official to step down GOP lawmakers join social media app billed as alternative to Big Tech MORE, John Kasich and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioJennifer Aniston urges fans to 'wear a damn mask:' 'It really shouldn't be a debate' OVERNIGHT ENERGY: House approves .5T green infrastructure plan | Rubio looks to defense bill to block offshore drilling, but some fear it creates a loophole | DC-area lawmakers push for analysis before federal agencies can be relocated The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Stagwell President Mark Penn says Trump is losing on fighting the virus; Fauci says U.S. 'going in the wrong direction' in fight against virus MORE in the RealClearPolitics average of polls in New Hampshire.

But recent polls have shown him making gains. Bush is in second place in New Hampshire, according to a Harper Polling survey released Wednesday, behind Trump. Trump holds a 17-point lead over Bush in that poll, with 31 percent support to 14.