Online poll: Trump up by 22 points in SC
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Republican primary front-runner Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpMinneapolis erupts for third night, as protests spread, Trump vows retaliation Stocks open mixed ahead of Trump briefing on China The island that can save America MORE leads GOP field in South Carolina by 22 points ahead of the next  GOP primary, according to a new poll.

The CBS News “Battleground Tracker” poll released on Sunday morning shows Trump with 42 percent support.

He’s followed by Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOn The Money: Trump signs order targeting social media firms' legal protections | 2M more Americans file new jobless claims, pushing total past 40M | White House to forgo summer economic forecast amid COVID-19, breaking precedent Trump signs order targeting social media firms' legal protections Overnight Defense: Trump ends sanctions waivers for Iran nuclear projects | Top Dems says State working on new Saudi arms sale | 34-year-old Army reservist ID'd as third military COVID-19 death MORE (R-Texas) with 20 percent support, Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioTrump administration designates B of PPP funds for community lenders The Memo: Trump's Scarborough tweets unsettle his allies House passes bill that would sanction Chinese officials over Xinjiang camps MORE (R-Fla.) with 15 percent support and Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R), who has seen a small surge after his second-place showing in New Hampshire, with 9 percent support.

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Cruz wins a plurality of voters who describe themselves as “very conservative,” but trails Trump among conservatives overall and moderate Republicans.

The billionaire businessman is also bolstered by an anti-establishment sentiment in the Palmetto State, with respondents by a four-to-one margin describing the “establishment” as a bad thing.

Just 11 percent said the current crop of politicians in Washington knows how to get things done, while 45 percent said they are tired of business as usual.

The online CBS News poll surveyed 1,315 registered voters in South Carolina. It has a margin of error of 5.7 percent.