Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush says he's tired of Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump rips Dems' demands, impeachment talk: 'Witch Hunt continues!' Nevada Senate passes bill that would give Electoral College votes to winner of national popular vote The Hill's Morning Report - Pelosi remains firm despite new impeachment push MORE's attacks and wants to hit back.

“I don’t feel like he’s intimidating,” Bush told listeners at a rally in South Carolina. "He’s a bully — punch him back in the nose.

“I will not take a step back for a guy that’s like he is,” Bush continued. "Never. That’s wrong.”

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Bush also blasted the media for covering Trump's every word, saying they were ignoring discussion of real issues.

“All of these policy-oriented things don’t resonate because the press, basically, is at the mercy of Donald Trump,” he said.

“The more outlandish things he says about my brother [former President George W. Bush] say, knowing about 9/11 — you can’t make this stuff up.

Trump accused George W. Bush of lying about 9/11 during the last GOP presidential debate.

He later stepped back from those remarks, saying he didn't know if Bush had lied about weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.

“This is Michael Moore stuff. This is MoveOn.org stuff,” Jeb Bush added Wednesday. "No regular liberal would ever say that. It’s only these radical left people that are saying the stuff that Donald Trump is saying. That generates all the news.”

Bush said he was disheartened by the attention given to Trump.

“Meanwhile, back at the ranch, people are suffering,” he said. "People are deeply pessimistic. If there’s any frustration, it is, how do we get back to the business of giving people hope again that their lot in life can improve? That’s my mission and Trump is an obstacle in that.”

Bush’s remarks come as he struggles to gain ground in South Carolina ahead of Saturday's primary.

Trump leads the Republican field there by nearly 18 points, according to the latest RealClearPolitics average of polls. Bush is in fifth place, with 9.8 percent support.