GOP presidential front-runner Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump's top adviser on Asia to serve as deputy national security adviser United Auto Workers strike against GM poised to head into eighth day Trump doubles down on call to investigate Biden after whistleblower complaint: 'That's the real story' MORE on Tuesday threw cold water on the possibility of Republicans holding a brokered convention in the event he does not lock up the necessary number of delegates to secure the nomination.

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"Yeah, I sort of do," Trump said on "Fox and Friends" when asked if he thought it was wrong to have the contested convention if he's leading in the delegate count but fails to reach the required 1,237 delegates.

"I think that whoever is leading at the end should sort of get it. That's the way that democracy works," Trump said on the program.

"I don't know that that's going to happen. But I'll tell you, there are going to be a lot of people that will be very upset if that doesn't happen," Trump said. "I think that would be pretty unfair."

Rivals Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioThe Memo: 'Whistleblower' furor gains steam Liberal super PAC launches browser extension replacing 'Mitch McConnell' with 'Moscow Mitch' Trump faces difficult balancing act with reelection campaign MORE, John Kasich and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzTrump walks tightrope on gun control State Department's top arms control official leaving Sanders NASA plan is definitely Earth first MORE are looking to rack up delegates in several states and keep him behold the delegate threshold, forcing a brokered convention in July.

Rubio and Kasich are looking at picking up wins in their home states of Florida and Ohio, which hold winner-take-all contests on March 15.

Trump argued Tuesday that he has brought millions of new voters into the Republican Party, pointing to record turnout in early voting states.

"There's life now in the Republican party," Trump said.

"It bothers me in the sense that it's really not fair," the businessman said of Republican efforts to deny him support with millions of dollars in attack ads.