GOP presidential front-runner Donald TrumpDonald TrumpSix big off-year elections you might be missing Twitter suspends GOP Rep. Banks for misgendering trans health official Meghan McCain to Trump: 'Thanks for the publicity' MORE on Tuesday threw cold water on the possibility of Republicans holding a brokered convention in the event he does not lock up the necessary number of delegates to secure the nomination.

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"Yeah, I sort of do," Trump said on "Fox and Friends" when asked if he thought it was wrong to have the contested convention if he's leading in the delegate count but fails to reach the required 1,237 delegates.

"I think that whoever is leading at the end should sort of get it. That's the way that democracy works," Trump said on the program.

"I don't know that that's going to happen. But I'll tell you, there are going to be a lot of people that will be very upset if that doesn't happen," Trump said. "I think that would be pretty unfair."

Rivals Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioSenate GOP campaign arm outraises Democratic counterpart in September House passes bills to secure telecommunications infrastructure Senators call for answers from US firm over reported use of forced Uyghur labor in China MORE, John Kasich and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Health Care — Presented by Carequest — Colin Powell's death highlights risks for immunocompromised The Senate confirmation process is broken — Senate Democrats can fix it Australian politician on Cruz, vaccines: 'We don't need your lectures, thanks mate' MORE are looking to rack up delegates in several states and keep him behold the delegate threshold, forcing a brokered convention in July.

Rubio and Kasich are looking at picking up wins in their home states of Florida and Ohio, which hold winner-take-all contests on March 15.

Trump argued Tuesday that he has brought millions of new voters into the Republican Party, pointing to record turnout in early voting states.

"There's life now in the Republican party," Trump said.

"It bothers me in the sense that it's really not fair," the businessman said of Republican efforts to deny him support with millions of dollars in attack ads.