Senate Dems tie vulnerable Republicans to Trump in new ad
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The campaign arm of Senate Democrats launched its first paid advertisement Tuesday, aiming to tie vulnerable Republican incumbents and upstart Senate challengers to GOP presidential front-runner Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: I hope voters pay attention to Dem tactics amid Kavanaugh fight South Korea leader: North Korea agrees to take steps toward denuclearization Graham calls handling of Kavanaugh allegations 'a drive-by shooting' MORE.

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) ad intersperses clips of some of Trump’s incendiary remarks — with a lot of foul language bleeped out — with clips of incumbents and House members running for Senate saying they’ll support Trump if he’s the party’s nominee.

Among those who make an appearance: Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump administration weakens methane pollution standards for drilling on public lands Another recession could hit US in 2019, says credit union association chief R-E-S-P-E-C-T: One legacy of Franklin and McCain is up to us MORE (Ariz.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanGraham calls handling of Kavanaugh allegations 'a drive-by shooting' Overnight Health Care: Senators target surprise medical bills | Group looks to allow Medicaid funds for substance abuse programs | FDA launches anti-vaping campaign for teens Bipartisan group wants to lift Medicaid restriction on substance abuse treatment MORE (Ohio), Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteGOP mulls having outside counsel question Kavanaugh, Ford Pallbearers, speakers announced for McCain's DC memorial service and Capitol ceremony Tributes pour in for John McCain MORE (N.H.), Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrOvernight Energy: Trump rolls back methane pollution rule | EPA watchdog to step down | China puts tariffs on US gas Graham: Mueller is going to be allowed to finish investigation Trump authorizes sanctions against foreign governments that interfere in US elections MORE (N.C.), Mark KirkMark Steven KirkThis week: Trump heads to Capitol Hill Trump attending Senate GOP lunch Tuesday High stakes as Trump heads to Hill MORE (Ill.), Pat Toomey (Pa.), Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntMurkowski echoes calls for Kavanaugh, accuser to testify Kavanaugh, accuser to testify publicly on Monday Kavanaugh furor intensifies as calls for new testimony grow MORE (Mo.), and Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonKavanaugh, accuser to testify publicly on Monday Kavanaugh furor intensifies as calls for new testimony grow House panel advances DHS cyber vulnerabilities bills MORE (Wis.).

Portman, Ayotte, Kirk, Toomey and Johnson all face tough reelection prospects in a presidential year, when turnout could favor Democrats. Kirk and Johnson are the most endangered of the bunch, while Portman, Ayotte and Toomey are running in hotly contested swing states.

Also in the ad are Reps. Joe Heck (Nev.), who is running for the seat being vacated by Sen. Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidKavanaugh furor intensifies as calls for new testimony grow Dems can’t ‘Bork’ Kavanaugh, and have only themselves to blame Dem senator: Confidential documents would 'strongly bolster' argument against Kavanaugh's nomination MORE (D-Nev.), and David Jolly (Fla.) and Ron DeSantis (Fla.), who are in a crowded primary running for the seat being vacated by Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRubio unloads on Turkish chef for 'feasting' Venezuela's Maduro: 'I got pissed' For Poland, a time for justice Judiciary Democrat calls for additional witnesses to testify on Kavanaugh MORE (Fla.).

“Republicans running for U.S. Senate, running with Trump,” text from the ad states.

It then cuts to Trump saying: “What the hell are we doing?”

“Exactly,” the ad concludes.

The DSCC says the ad is the first in what will be a “sustained campaign” across television, radio and social media meant to tie Republicans running for Senate to the controversial GOP front-runner.

Democrats have a good chance of taking back the Senate in 2016 after losing their majority in the last cycle.

Republicans are defending 24 seats, compared to only 10 for Democrats. If Democrats net five seats, they’ll win back the Senate.

Many Republicans up for reelection are running in states President Obama carried in 2008 or 2012.