Senate Dems tie vulnerable Republicans to Trump in new ad
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The campaign arm of Senate Democrats launched its first paid advertisement Tuesday, aiming to tie vulnerable Republican incumbents and upstart Senate challengers to GOP presidential front-runner Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden says his faith is 'bedrock foundation of my life' after Trump claim Coronavirus talks on life support as parties dig in, pass blame Ohio governor tests negative in second coronavirus test MORE.

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) ad intersperses clips of some of Trump’s incendiary remarks — with a lot of foul language bleeped out — with clips of incumbents and House members running for Senate saying they’ll support Trump if he’s the party’s nominee.

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Among those who make an appearance: Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainCNN's Ana Navarro to host Biden roundtable on making 'Trump a one-term president' Mark Kelly clinches Democratic Senate nod in Arizona Prominent conservatives question Jerry Falwell Jr. vacation photo MORE (Ariz.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanPessimism grows as coronavirus talks go down to the wire Senators holding behind-the-scenes talks on breaking coronavirus package stalemate Overnight Defense: Pompeo pressed on move to pull troops from Germany | Panel abruptly scraps confirmation hearing | Trump meets family of slain soldier MORE (Ohio), Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteBottom line Bottom line Bottom Line MORE (N.H.), Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrSenate GOP opens door to smaller coronavirus deal as talks lag Hillicon Valley: Google extending remote work policy through July 2021 | Intel community returns final Russia report to Senate committee after declassification | Study finds election officials vulnerable to cyberattacks Intel community returns final Russia report volume to Senate after declassification review MORE (N.C.), Mark KirkMark Steven KirkLiberal veterans group urges Biden to name Duckworth VP On the Trail: Senate GOP hopefuls tie themselves to Trump Biden campaign releases video to explain 'what really happened in Ukraine' MORE (Ill.), Pat Toomey (Pa.), Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntSkepticism grows over Friday deadline for coronavirus deal GOP expects Senate to be in session next week without coronavirus deal House Republicans introduce legislation to give states 0 million for elections MORE (Mo.), and Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGOP chairmen hit back at accusation they are spreading disinformation with Biden probe Unemployment debate sparks GOP divisions Tensions flare as GOP's Biden probe ramps up  MORE (Wis.).

Portman, Ayotte, Kirk, Toomey and Johnson all face tough reelection prospects in a presidential year, when turnout could favor Democrats. Kirk and Johnson are the most endangered of the bunch, while Portman, Ayotte and Toomey are running in hotly contested swing states.

Also in the ad are Reps. Joe Heck (Nev.), who is running for the seat being vacated by Sen. Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidMcConnell goes hands-off on coronavirus relief bill Kamala Harris to young Black women at conference: 'I want you to be ambitious' Obama calls filibuster 'Jim Crow relic,' backs new Voting Rights Act bill MORE (D-Nev.), and David Jolly (Fla.) and Ron DeSantis (Fla.), who are in a crowded primary running for the seat being vacated by Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioPessimism grows as coronavirus talks go down to the wire McConnell: Wearing a mask is 'single most significant thing' to fight pandemic McConnell goes hands-off on coronavirus relief bill MORE (Fla.).

“Republicans running for U.S. Senate, running with Trump,” text from the ad states.

It then cuts to Trump saying: “What the hell are we doing?”

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“Exactly,” the ad concludes.

The DSCC says the ad is the first in what will be a “sustained campaign” across television, radio and social media meant to tie Republicans running for Senate to the controversial GOP front-runner.

Democrats have a good chance of taking back the Senate in 2016 after losing their majority in the last cycle.

Republicans are defending 24 seats, compared to only 10 for Democrats. If Democrats net five seats, they’ll win back the Senate.

Many Republicans up for reelection are running in states President Obama carried in 2008 or 2012.