Cruz campaign trying to kick Kasich off Montana ballot
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Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzGOP senators ask for federal investigation into social media companies' decision-making The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - Trump attack on progressive Dems draws sharp rebuke Ted Cruz blasts Tennessee GOP governor for declaration honoring early KKK leader MORE’s presidential campaign is seeking to get John Kasich thrown off the ballot in Montana, a winner-take-all state where voters will cast ballots on the final day of the GOP primary race.

Emails obtained by The Associated Press show that the Cruz campaign has challenged the validity of signatures the Kasich campaign submitted to get on the ballot.

State rules require a petition with 500 signatures, and Kasich submitted 622, according to the report. But the Cruz campaign has argued that data they submitted is full of discrepancies and that Kasich should therefore be disqualified from competing in the state.

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“There is a reasonable probability that material defects with his petitions reduce the number of valid signatures below the required minimum ... and John Kasich is therefore not eligible for placement on the ballot,” the Cruz campaign said, according to the report.

The co-chairman of Kasich’s Montana operation, Greg Frank, told the AP that all of the signatures are valid.

"The validity and the integrity of the signatures I can personally attest to,” he said. “I personally collected the majority of them, and I personally submitted them to the county elections office.”

Frank said Cruz “might be afraid of the competition.”

"If they're going to try dirty pool and dirty politics, I think there will be consequences with the electorate,” he said.

The Cruz campaign believes Kasich is playing the spoiler by siphoning votes away and keeping the anti-Trump movement from coalescing behind Cruz.

The Montana secretary of state told the AP that it was up to county election officials to verify Kasich’s signatures and that he will remain on the ballot unless a judge decides otherwise.