Sanders: Wisconsin voter ID laws are ‘un-American’
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Wisconsin's new voter identification law will debut in Tuesday’s hotly contested presidential primary, and Democratic presidential candidate Bernie SandersBernie Sanders2020 Democrats make play for veterans' votes 2020 Dems put focus on stemming veteran suicides The Memo: Democrats confront prospect of long primary MORE isn't happy about it.

That's probably because some of his voter base, young people and college students, may be among those it affects most.

The law, which requires voters to present a government-issued ID at their polling stations, is estimated to affect at least 300,000 people, especially the elderly who have expired driver's licenses, younger voters, college students and the poor, according to MSNBC. Republicans often argue such laws prevent voter fraud.

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Gov. Scott Walker signed the law in 2011, but it was tied up in the courts until 2015, when the Supreme Court refused to hear the case, allowing it to stand. Tuesday will be the first election in the state under the new law.

Sanders on Sunday relentlessly attacked Walker for what he calls "voter suppression." 

"I think what Gov. Walker and what other Republican governors and legislators are doing is not only shameful, it's un-American in the deepest sense of the word," Sanders said at a rally in Wausau, Wis. 

"Trying to figure out ways, 'Gee, senior citizens may vote against me, how do I make it harder for them to participate? Young people may vote against me, how do I make sure that many of them will not vote?'" Sanders said, emulating what he thinks a Republican lawmaker would say. 

It's not the first time Sanders has criticized voter ID laws or the Republicans who often stand behind them. The new law could mean fewer Democrats show up to the polls Tuesday.  

Sanders only has a 2.2 point lead over Clinton in Wisconsin, where 96 delegates are up for grabs, according to a RealClearPolitics average of polls.

Sanders said Republican governors such as Walker are "working overtime" to suppress voters and "make it harder for people to participate." 

"So, I say to Gov. Walker, and I say to Republican governors all over the country, if you are afraid to participate in free, fair and open elections, get out of politics. Get another job."