Bernie SandersBernie SandersGOP sees debt ceiling as its leverage against Biden Democrats brace for slog on Biden's spending plan To break the corporate tax logjam, tax overinflated CEO pay MORE on Thursday night accused Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonA path to climate, economic and environmental justice is finally on the horizon Polling misfired in 2020 — and that's a lesson for journalists and pundits Biden flexes presidential muscle on campaign trail with Virginia's McAuliffe MORE of using a “racist” term when she described young black criminals in the 1990s as “superpredators.”

At the Democratic presidential debate in Brooklyn, Sanders was asked why he attacked Clinton on the campaign trail earlier in the week for using the term.

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“Because it was a racist term and everybody knew it was a racist term," Sanders responded.

The crowd cheered his response and Clinton grimaced.

Last month, the former first lady apologized to a protester who confronted her for having used the term.

“Looking back, I shouldn't have used those words, and I wouldn't use them today," Clinton said.

Moments earlier at the debate, Clinton apologized for what she said were the unintended consequences of the 1994 crime bill her husband, then-President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonFor families, sending money home to Cuba shouldn't be a political football Anything-but-bipartisan 1/6 commission will seal Pelosi's retirement. Here's why Could Andrew Cuomo — despite scandals — be re-elected because of Trump? MORE, signed into law.

Sanders also voted for the law. Both have said there were good aspects to it, such as the Violence Against Women Act, but both say it also led to the over-incarceration of African-Americans.

“My husband has apologized, he was the president who actually signed it,” Clinton said. “Sen. Sanders voted for it.

"But I’m sorry for the consequences that were unintended and have had a very unfortunate impact on peoples lives," she continued. I’ve seen the results and impact it has had on families and communities.”