Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP congressman slams Trump over report that U.S. bombed former anti-ISIS coalition headquarters US to restore 'targeted assistance' to Central American countries after migration deal Trump says lawmakers should censure Schiff MORE basked in his New York primary victory from Trump Tower on Tuesday night, declaring that the GOP presidential nominating process is all but over.

“We don’t have much of a race anymore,” Trump said, adding that rival Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzThe Hill's Morning Report - Dem debate contenders take aim at Warren The Hill's Morning Report - Trump grapples with Turkey controversy This week: Congress returns to chaotic Washington MORE "is just about mathematically eliminated.”

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Trump is poised to take a strong majority of New York's 95 delegates on Tuesday night.

Cruz is on track for a third-place finish and possibly getting shut out, which would bring him close to being mathematically eliminated from winning the nomination before the Republican National Convention in July. Still, Cruz will soldier on, hoping to block Trump from securing the 1,237 delegates he needs to avoid a contested convention.

"We’ve won millions more votes than Sen. Cruz, millions and millions more than Gov. [John] Kasich," Trump said. "We’re really, really rocking and we expect we’ll have an amazing number of weeks.” 

For Trump, Tuesday’s victory ends several weeks of losses to Cruz at party conventions in states including Colorado and Wyoming.

Trump was routed in those contests, which test a campaign’s organizational strength.

The GOP front-runner has railed against the process, calling it “rigged” and accusing party leaders of seeking to steal the nomination from him.

He continued hammering that message on Tuesday night.

“Nobody should be given delegates, which is a ticket to victory, and it’s not a fair ticket,” Trump said.

“Even though we’re leading by a lot, and it’s impossible to catch us, nobody should claim victory unless they get those delegates with voters and voting, and that’s what’s going to happen, you watch,” he continued. “People aren’t going to stand for it. It’s a crooked system, and we’re going back to the old way where you vote and win.”

The map lines up nicely for Trump over the next week, with contests in the Northeastern states including Maryland, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Delaware.

Trump will be favored in all of those states, but his first campaign stop will be on Wednesday in Indiana, where the primary is not until May 3.

“Tomorrow morning we go back to work,” Trump said. “I’m flying to Indiana and Pennsylvania. I’ll be all over. We’ll celebrate for about two hours, then early in the morning I get up and we start working again.”

Updated at 10:07 a.m.