Carson releases Nevada delegates
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Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson has released the two delegates he won in the Nevada caucuses, meaning they are now free to support whichever candidate they choose at the Republican National Convention in July, CNN reported.

Carson, who dropped out of the race in March and later endorsed Republican front-runner Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpMcCabe says he was fired because he 'opened a case against' Trump McCabe: Trump said 'I don't care, I believe Putin' when confronted with US intel on North Korea McCabe: Trump talked to me about his election victory during 'bizarre' job interview MORE, won about 5 percent of the vote in the Nevada caucuses. 

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The state allocates delegates proportionally, giving him two of the 30 delegates at stake.

On Friday, Carson sent a letter to the Nevada Republican Party asking that his delegates be released from supporting him.

He had the choice to release his delegates or to let the party reapportion them based on the percentage the remaining candidates won in the state. 

Trump, who is getting closer to clinching the nomination, won about 46 percent of the vote in the state, securing 14 delegates, according to The Associated Press. Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRubio in Colombia to push for delivery of humanitarian aid to Venezuela On unilateral executive action, Mitch McConnell was right — in 2014 On The Money: Trump declares emergency at border | Braces for legal fight | Move divides GOP | Trump signs border deal to avoid shutdown | Winners, losers from spending fight | US, China trade talks to resume next week MORE (R-Fla.), who also dropped out of the race in March, won 7 delegates.

Next weekend, grassroots activists and party insiders will decide who will serve as delegates from Nevada. Carson's two released delegates could go to Trump if the front-runner gets enough of his backers elected as delegates in the state.

Trump needs 1,237 delegates to clinch the nomination and avoid a contested convention. His next opportunity to advance toward that goal is Tuesday, when Indiana votes in its primary. The Hoosier State is viewed by some as a last chance for fellow candidates Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzEl Chapo's lawyer fires back at Cruz: 'Ludicrous' to suggest drug lord will pay for wall Democrats have a chance of beating Trump with Julian Castro on the 2020 ticket Poll shows competitive matchup if O’Rourke ran for Senate again MORE and John Kasich to capture enough delegates themselves to force a contested convention.