John Kasich is suspending his bid for the White House, The Hill has confirmed.

The Ohio governor will make the announcement about his campaign at 5 p.m. on Wednesday in Columbus, Ohio, his campaign said. Kasich abruptly canceled a news conference planned for Wednesday morning outside Washington, D.C.

ADVERTISEMENT

This follows Kasich's third-place finish in Indiana, where GOP front-runner Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpGrassley: Dems 'withheld information' on new Kavanaugh allegation Health advocates decry funding transfer over migrant children Groups plan mass walkout in support of Kavanaugh accuser MORE dominated with a landslide victory.

Kasich agreed to cease campaigning in the Hoosier State to clear a path for Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzViral video shows O’Rourke air-drumming to the Who’s ‘Baba O’Riley’ after Cruz debate Five takeaways from Cruz, O'Rourke's fiery first debate NY Times, McCabe give Trump perfect cover to fire Rosenstein, Sessions MORE (R-Texas), in an effort to stop Trump from getting the needed delegates to secure the nomination. 

But Cruz suspended his presidential campaign Tuesday night after a devastating loss to Trump. Cruz and Kasich had already been mathematically eliminated from winning the nomination on the first ballot.

During his victory speech in Manhattan, Trump — now the presumptive GOP nominee — declared that Republicans will win in November and called on the party to coalesce around him and unite.

Kasich trailed Trump by almost 900 delegates. But he previously vowed to stay in the race in the hopes he could emerge as the party’s nominee in a contested GOP convention this July.

The Ohio governor often trumpeted general election polls where he was the only GOP candidate to defeat Democratic front-runner Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGraham: There's a 'bureaucratic coup' taking place against Trump Fox News poll shows Dems with edge ahead of midterms Poll: Democrats in position to retake the House MORE in the fall.

Kasich won just one state during the race, his home state of Ohio, and failed to gain traction in the Midwestern and Northeastern states that he had predicted would propel his candidacy. Kasich ended up with fewer delegates than Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioNikki Haley: New York Times ‘knew the facts’ about curtains and still released story March For Our Lives founder leaves group, says he regrets trying to 'embarrass' Rubio Rubio unloads on Turkish chef for 'feasting' Venezuela's Maduro: 'I got pissed' MORE, who ended his own campaign in mid-March after he lost his home state of Florida.

The governor tried to set himself apart from the rhetoric of the Republican field, repeatedly saying that he would not "take the low road to the highest office in the land.” 

Most swing-state polls found Kasich with the best chance of vanquishing either Hillary Clinton and Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersFive takeaways from Cruz, O'Rourke's fiery first debate Ben & Jerry’s co-founders announce effort to help 7 Dem House challengers Dems look to Gillum, Abrams for pathway to victory in tough states MORE, a point that his team cited repeatedly as they sought to keep his candidacy alive.

As the sitting governor of the state in which the Republican National Convention will be held, Kasich is likely to have a role -- and possibly a speaking slot -- in the July event. Those speculating about potential vice presidential candidates include Kasich on the list, although the former Congressman has, while he was a presidential candidate, rejected such talk.

Jonathan Easley and Lisa Hagen contributed.

— This post was updated at 1:34 p.m.