Fresh off his victory in Indiana, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie SandersBernie SandersSirota reacts to report of harassment, doxing by Harris supporters Republicans not immune to the malady that hobbled Democrats The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Republicans lawmakers rebuke Trump on election MORE expressed confidence that he can pull off "one of the great political upsets" in American history to defeat Democratic front-runner Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBloomberg rolls out M ad buy to boost Biden in Florida Hillicon Valley: Productivity, fatigue, cybersecurity emerge as top concerns amid pandemic | Facebook critics launch alternative oversight board | Google to temporarily bar election ads after polls close Trump pledges to make Juneteenth a federal holiday, designate KKK a terrorist group in pitch to Black voters MORE and presumptive GOP nominee Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal prosecutor speaks out, says Barr 'has brought shame' on Justice Dept. Former Pence aide: White House staffers discussed Trump refusing to leave office Progressive group buys domain name of Trump's No. 1 Supreme Court pick MORE.

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At a Tuesday night press conference, the Vermont senator touted the momentum of his campaign while acknowledging that it's an uphill battle for him to clinch the nomination.

"We feel great about tonight, not only in winning here in Indiana ... but also gaining the momentum we need to take us to the finish line," Sanders said. "I sense some great deal of momentum.

"I sense some great victories coming, and I think while the path is narrow — and I do not deny that for a moment — I think we can pull off one of the great political upsets in the history of the United States and, in fact, become the nominee for the Democratic Party," he continued. "And once we secure that position, I have absolute confidence that we are gonna defeat Donald Trump in the general election."

The Indiana Democratic primary was too close to call once all the polls closed at 7 p.m. EDT. The contest was neck and neck, but Sanders later pulled ahead of Clinton.

As of 11 p.m., Sanders led 52 percent to 48 percent, with 95 percent of precincts reporting, according to The Associated Press.

Sanders said he believes he's the best candidate to take on Trump in November. The real estate mogul is now the presumptive GOP nominee after his landslide victory in Indiana prompted Texas Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzCrenshaw looms large as Democrats look to flip Texas House seat SCOTUS confirmation in the last month of a close election? Ugly The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump previews SCOTUS nominee as 'totally brilliant' MORE to suspend his campaign.

The Vermont senator’s victory in the Hoosier State breaks Clinton's recent winning streak. But though he won Indiana, the state's Democratic primary allocates delegates proportionally, so he will barely make a dent in the former secretary of State's delegate lead.

Clinton is shy of the Democratic nomination by 182 delegates, according to the AP delegate tracker. Sanders would need to win every remaining pledged delegate and sway more superdelegates to his side to reach that threshold.

On Tuesday night, Sanders said he will continue to "make the case" to the superdelegates that reside in states where he claimed resounding victories.

"I believe we’ll be able to make the case to many of those superdelegates that what is most important is not whether Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders is the nominee," Sanders said. "What is most important is that we do not allow someone like a Donald Trump to become president of the United States."