Democratic presidential candidate Bernie SandersBernie SandersDemocrats worry they don't have right candidate to beat Trump Overnight Health Care: Top health official defends contract payments to Trump allies | Vaping advocates confident Trump will turn from flavor ban | Sanders gets endorsement from nurses union Krystal Ball credits Gabbard's upswing in 2020 race to 'feckless' Democratic establishment MORE on Tuesday dismissed rival Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonDemocrats worry they don't have right candidate to beat Trump Krystal Ball credits Gabbard's upswing in 2020 race to 'feckless' Democratic establishment Outsider candidates outpoll insider candidates MORE's comments that she would put Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonSteyer scores endorsement from key New Hampshire activist House drip-bombing of witness testimony softens landing zone for public support Republican who aided in Clinton impeachment trial: Trump Ukraine phone call 'troublesome' MORE in charge of the economy if she wins the White House.

“Put Bill Clinton in charge of the economy?” Sanders asked in San Juan, Puerto Rico. "That’s her judgment."

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“My judgment is, if elected president, we’re going to put people in charge of the economy who do not come from Wall Street, who understand that we’ve got to reverse the decline of the American middle class, people that understand that we’ve got to address, in a very forceful way, the grotesque level of income and wealthy inequality,” Sanders added.

“We’ve got to create millions of jobs rebuilding our crumbling infrastructure and raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour — and, by the way, break up the large Wall Street banks. Those are the people that I will put in charge of the economy.”

Hillary Clinton on Sunday hinted that she would put her husband in charge of “revitalizing the economy” if elected president.

She on Monday clarified that she would not nominate the former president for a Cabinet position. 

Hillary Clinton has repeatedly touted Bill Clinton’s economic record, pointing to increased wages and job creating during his tenure. 

“I’ve told my husband that he’s got to come out of retirement and be in charge of this, because, you know, he’s got more ideas a minute than anybody I know,” she said at a campaign event earlier this month in Ashland, Ky.

“Gotta put people back to work and make it happen. So we’re going to give it all we’ve got, absolute, full-in, 100-percent effort, because I worry we won’t recognize our country if we don’t do this."