Trump leads Clinton by 5 points in Rasmussen poll
© Getty Images

Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpPolice say man dangling off Trump Tower Chicago demanding to speak with Trump Fauci says he was 'absolutely not' surprised Trump got coronavirus after Rose Garden event Biden: Trump 'continues to lie to us' about coronavirus MORE has increased his lead over Democratic front-runner Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham Clinton Rally crowd chants 'lock him up' as Trump calls Biden family 'a criminal enterprise' Undecided voters in Arizona wary of Trump, crave stability Push to expand Supreme Court faces Democratic buzzsaw MORE, according to a new Rasmussen Reports poll released Thursday.

Trump now leads Clinton by 5 percentage points, 42 to 37 percent. The poll also found that 13 percent of respondents prefer another candidate and 7 percent were undecided.

ADVERTISEMENT

The new poll differs somewhat from recent polling, which shows Clinton holding a slim lead. According to the RealClearPolitics average of polls, Clinton has a 3.9-point lead over Trump, 46.2 to 42.3 percent. 

But Trump led a Fox News national poll released Wednesday by 3 points.

A Rasmussen poll released at the beginning of the month showed Trump leading Clinton by 2 points.

In the new poll, Trump has 76 percent support among Republicans, while Clinton has 72 percent among Democrats. The poll also finds that 13 percent of Democrats prefer Trump, and 9 percent of Republicans prefer Clinton.

Among independent voters, Trump has an advantage over Clinton, 41 to 28 percent. But nearly one-third of voters not affiliated with either major party say they will choose another candidate or are undecided.

Trump leads Clinton among men by 22 points, while Clinton leads Trump among women by 11 points.

Clinton holds a large lead over Trump among black voters, but Trump leads among white voters.

Clinton is preferred by voters under 40, while Trump has more support among older voters. Still, about one-third of younger voters say they like another candidate or are undecided.

The survey was conducted May 17–18 among 1,000 likely voters. It has a margin of error of 3 percentage points.