Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonPaul Ryan defends Navy admiral after Trump's criticism Retired Army General: Trump is ‘acting like an 8th grader’ in attacking ex-Navy SEAL who led bin Laden operation Questions grow about FBI vetting of Christopher Steele’s Russia expertise MORE thinks the race for the Democratic nomination is all but over, telling CNN Thursday there's "no way" she won't be the party's presidential nominee. 

ADVERTISEMENT

"I will be the nominee for my party, Chris. That is already done in effect. There is no way I won't be," the former first lady told CNN's Chris Cuomo. 

Clinton called her delegate lead over rival Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersOvernight Energy: EPA official steps down after indictment on ethics charges | Sanders to hold town hall on climate | Zinke slams 'environmental radicals' for fires Sanders to host town hall on climate change Sanders on 2020 White House bid: 'We're looking at it' MORE "insurmountable" and said she expects him to unite behind her and rally his supporters to take on Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpPaul Ryan defends Navy admiral after Trump's criticism Trump discussing visit overseas to troops following criticism: report Retired Army General: Trump is ‘acting like an 8th grader’ in attacking ex-Navy SEAL who led bin Laden operation MORE once she clinches the nomination. 

"When I came out and withdrew and endorsed Sen. Obama, about 40 percent of my supporters said they would never support him, so I worked really hard to make the case, as I'm sure Sen. Sanders will," Clinton said. "Whatever differences we may have, they pale in comparison to the presumptive nominee of the Republican party." 

She made the comments amid increasing fury between Sanders supporters and the Democratic Party that have sparked fears among Washington Democrats about whether the party will come together around Clinton. 

Tensions erupted at the Nevada State Democratic Convention over the weekend, as supporters of Sanders shouted Clinton supporter Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerFox's Ingraham transitioning longtime radio show to podcast Former Dem aide makes first court appearance on charges of posting GOP senators' info online Ex-House intern charged with 'doxing' GOP senators during Kavanaugh hearing MORE (D-Calif.) off-stage. The Sanders backers were angry that petitions they'd presented for rules changes to the convention were not considered. 

The chairwoman of the Nevada Democratic Party received death threats and obscene messages on her voicemail from people angered by what had happend.

The Democratic National Committee and Senate Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidDems wonder if Sherrod Brown could be their magic man Nevada New Members 2019 Meet the lawyer Democrats call when it's recount time MORE (D-Nev.) blamed the incident on Sanders supporters and called on the Vermont senator to step in. Sanders has been defiant, releasing a statement that condemned any violence but largely blamed the Democratic Party.

Sanders has little hope of defeating Clinton in the delegate race but has insisted he could make a comeback by winning California's primary on June 7.

Clinton currently leads Sanders by 274 pledged delegates. Including superdelegates, she is 760 delegates ahead of Sanders and just 90 delegates away from the 2,383 needed to clinch the party's presidential nomination. 

Sanders hopes to close the gap in pledged delegates in California and New Jersey and sway superdelegates — party leaders who can back any candidate — to support him over Clinton.