Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinData shows seven Senate Democrats have majority non-white staffs Bottom line Filibuster reform gains steam with Democrats MORE (D-Calif.) said critics should stop focusing on Democratic front-runner Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillicon Valley: Facebook civil rights audit finds 'serious setbacks' | Facebook takes down Roger Stone-affiliated accounts, pages | State and local officials beg Congress for more elections funds OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Sanders-Biden climate task force calls for carbon-free power by 2035 | Park Police did not record radio transmissions during June 1 sweep of White House protesters | Court upholds protections for Yellowstone grizzly bears GOP Miami mayor does not commit to voting for Trump MORE's email controversy and start concentrating on the issues facing the country.

"This goes on and on and on. We're reaching the final stages of a primary," she said on ABC's "This Week" in an interview that aired Sunday.

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"Hillary Clinton is going to win this primary. I say enough is enough. Let's get to the major problems facing this nation."

An internal watchdog determined in a report sent to Capitol Hill last week that Clinton and her senior aides didn't comply with the State Department's record-keeping policies. The report said Clinton never requested permission to use her personal server, and it "would not" have been approved, in part, because of "the security risks in doing so." 

Feinstein, who endorsed Clinton, said she doesn't think Clinton has been misleading the public, adding that the front-runner hasn't broken any law.

"I read all 42 pages of the report. The conclusion of the report does not say that. What it says is that the department does not handle these electronic platform operations well and needs to do better," Feinstein said.

"Hillary herself has said, 'Yes, I made a mistake. If I had a chance to do it over again, I'd do it differently.' I mean, what do people want?"

Feinstein continued to defend the former secretary of State, saying she doesn't believe Clinton was trying to hide anything.

"I think this is a woman who wants a little bit of a private life. She wants to be able to communicate with husband, with daughter, with friends and not have somebody looking over her shoulder into her emails," Feinstein said.

"Having said that, it is what it is and, you know, I don't think we should make a federal case over it."