Clinton: Trump University ‘a fraudulent scheme’
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Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham Clinton Ilhan Omar: GOP response to calls for police reform 'was vicious' Maine poised to allow ranked voting for president after state ruling Trump ad ties Biden to defund police effort, warns Americans 'won't be safe' MORE on Wednesday described Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpProgressive group launches M pro-Biden ad buy targeting young voters Ilhan Omar: GOP response to calls for police reform 'was vicious' White House considers sweeping travel ban on members, families of the Chinese Communist Party: report MORE’s controversial Trump University program as a "fraudulent scheme."

In a tweet, the Democratic presidential front-runner said it was "used to prey upon those who could least afford it."

Clinton linked to a New York Times report quoting former Trump University employees who derided the program.

She also reposted a tweet from 2012 Republican nominee Mitt Romney, who called Trump, the party's presumptive standard-bearer for 2016, a "phony" and a "fraud."

Clinton's press secretary Brian Fallon also weighed in, comparing Trump University to Donald Trump's presidential campaign.

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A federal judge on Tuesday unsealed 381 pages of documents detailing the for-profit real estate program.

Judge Gonzalo Curiel made the information public as part of a lawsuit seeking damages from Trump University and accusing it of fraud.

The documents amount to “playbooks” used by the company to convince prospective students to enroll in the program. They instructed recruiters to encourage potential participants to pay for the classes, which could cost up to $35,000, using “other people’s money.”

“We teach the technique of using OPM…other people’s money,” the sales script reads in a sample conversation between a staffer and a curious student.

“Most students who are invited to this program use established lines of credit, like a credit card, utilizing the bank’s money, OPM, to handle their tuition. I’m not talking about tens of thousands of dollars, but on the other hand, not a couple of hundred dollars either.”

Trump University faced a handful of legal challenges, as well as scrutiny from the New York Department of Education, before shutting down in 2011.

Some students allege the program defrauded them, teaching them little and leaving them saddled with debt.

Trump has pointed to those with more positive experiences, adding he will not settle the suits and promising courts will vindicate him.

The billionaire last week labeled Curiel “a hater,” noting his appointment by President Obama and his “Mexican” heritage.

“I think Judge Curiel should be ashamed of himself,” he said during a rally in San Diego. "I’m telling you, this court system, judges in this court system, federal court, they ought to look into Judge Curiel. Because what Judge Curiel is doing is a total disgrace, OK?”  

Curiel was born in Indiana to immigrant parents, according to a Federal Bar Association profile, and spent several years as a criminal prosecutor on narcotics cases.

—This report was updated at 11:39 a.m.