Calif. sees record high voter registrations going into primary
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A record number of voters have registered in California ahead of its presidential primary this week, the state's secretary of state announced Friday.

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A report released on Friday shows that there are 17,915,053 voters registered as of the state’s May 23 deadline, the most the state has ever seen going into a primary.

“Nearly 18 million California citizens are registered to vote in the June 7 Presidential Primary,” Secretary of State Alex Padilla said in a statement.  

“In the 45 days leading up to the voter registration deadline, there was a huge surge in voter registration — total statewide voter registration increased by nearly 650,000. Part of this surge was fueled through social media, as Facebook sent a reminder to all California users to register to vote.”

According to the report, about 72 percent of eligible Californians are registered to vote.

Of the state’s voters, about 45 percent are registered as Democrats, which is a one-point increase since April. Republicans make up about 27 percent and unaffiliated voters account for about 23 percent.

Around this date in 2012, there were 17,153,699 registered voters in Calif.

Democratic presidential candidates Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGeorge Takei: US has hit a new low under Trump Democrats slam Puerto Rico governor over 'shameful' comments, back protesters Matt Gaetz ahead of Mueller hearing: 'We are going to reelect the president' MORE and Bernie SandersBernie SandersBullock: I would not have endorsed health care for undocumented immigrants on debate stage Harris faces pressure to define policy proposals Biden campaign rips 'Medicare for All,' calls on Dems to protect Affordable Care Act MORE have both campaigned heavily ahead of the Tuesday primary. California, the most populous state, offers the most delegates of any state. 

Polls have shown the two Democrats nearly even. Clinton has big edge overall in delegates, but Sanders is hoping for a Garden State win to bolster his argument that superdelegates should support him over Clinton.

On the Republican side, presumptive nominee Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpLiz Cheney: 'Send her back' chant 'inappropriate' but not about race, gender Booker: Trump is 'worse than a racist' Top Democrat insists country hasn't moved on from Mueller MORE has no competitors in the California primary. But he is campaigning in the state nonetheless, pledging to fight to win it in the general election.