Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOvernight Defense: Appeals court revives House lawsuit against military funding for border wall | Dems push for limits on transferring military gear to police | Lawmakers ask for IG probe into Pentagon's use of COVID-19 funds On The Money: Half of states deplete funds for Trump's 0 unemployment expansion | EU appealing ruling in Apple tax case | House Democrats include more aid for airlines in coronavirus package Warren, Khanna request IG investigation into Pentagon's use of coronavirus funds MORE (D-Mass.) on Saturday said she lacks faith in her own party’s superdelegate process.

“I’m a superdelegate, and I don’t believe in superdelegates,” she said at the Massachusetts State Democratic Convention in Lowell, Mass. "I don’t think superdelegates ought to sway the election.”

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Politico on Saturday reported the Massachusetts Democratic Party voted on a resolution to “thoroughly, objectively and transparently” study the superdelegate system before the 2020 presidential election.

Warren, who remains publicly neutral in this year’s Democratic presidential primary, said she agrees with the decision.

“Yes, I do,” she said when asked if Massachusetts's superdelegate rules deserve such scrutiny.

Superdelegates like Warren are not bound by primary or caucus results to any presidential candidate during next month’s Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBloomberg rolls out M ad buy to boost Biden in Florida Hillicon Valley: Productivity, fatigue, cybersecurity emerge as top concerns amid pandemic | Facebook critics launch alternative oversight board | Google to temporarily bar election ads after polls close Trump pledges to make Juneteenth a federal holiday, designate KKK a terrorist group in pitch to Black voters MORE remains the Democratic presidential front-runner nationwide, boasting 2,313 delegates to 1,547 for her rival, Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSirota reacts to report of harassment, doxing by Harris supporters Republicans not immune to the malady that hobbled Democrats The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Republicans lawmakers rebuke Trump on election MORE (I-Vt.).

Clinton’s total includes 1,769 pledged delegates and 544 superdelegates, while Sanders has 1,501 pledged delegates and 46 superdelegates. At least 2,383 delegates are needed to avoid a contested convention.

Warren on Saturday demurred when asked if Sanders should suspend his White House run due to his delegate gap with Clinton.

“Sanders has brought a lot of energy to this campaign, and that is a decision for Bernie Sanders to make,” she said.

Warren added “no timetable” exists for her to make an endorsement of either candidate.

“I think the party is united,” she said when asked if she could mend fences between the pair’s supporters.

“I’m in this fight all the way to stop Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal prosecutor speaks out, says Barr 'has brought shame' on Justice Dept. Former Pence aide: White House staffers discussed Trump refusing to leave office Progressive group buys domain name of Trump's No. 1 Supreme Court pick MORE,” Warren added of the GOP’s presumptive presidential nominee.

Warren fiercely attacked Trump’s credibility during her address at the Massachusetts State Democratic Convention.

“Here’s a man who builds a business to profit off other people's pain,” she said of the billionaire’s Trump University program. "He wants to be commander in chief, but he’s only qualified to be fraudster in chief."