“It may be hard to see tonight, but we are all standing under a glass ceiling right now — but don’t worry, we’re not smashing this one,” the Democratic front-runner told a roaring crowd in Brooklyn.
 
“Thanks to you we’ve reached a milestone: the first time in our nation’s history that a woman will be a major party’s nominee,” she said.
 
Clinton won't officially be the party's standard-bearer until she is formally nominated at the Democratic National Convention next month, but her delegate support makes that all but certain.

The speech was the first time she declared herself the Democratic Party's nominee. Ahead of the Brooklyn rally, her campaign released a new video highlighting those who have fought for women's rights and calling on people to "keep making history.”

"So yes, there are still ceilings to break for women, men, for all of us, but don’t let anyone tell you that great things can’t happen in America," Clinton said.

"This campaign is about making sure there are no ceilings, no limits on any of us, and this is our moment to come together," she added.

The former secretary of State spoke Tuesday after a victory in New Jersey's primary. Clinton also scored a victory in New Mexico and is leading in South Dakota. Sanders won the North Dakota caucuses and has an early lead in Montana. 

The two are locked in a tight race in California, where polls closed at 11 p.m. EDT on Tuesday.
 
 
"Whether you supported me or Sen. Sanders or one of the Republicans, we need to keep working toward a better, fairer, stronger America," she said.
 
"I want to congratulate Sen. Sanders for the extraordinary campaign he has run. He has spent his long career in public service fighting for progressive causes and principles and he's excited millions of voters, especially young people," Clinton said. "Let there be no mistake: Sen. Sanders, his campaign and the vigorous debate that we've had about how to raise income, reduce inequality, increase upward mobility, have been very good for the Democratic Party and for America."

She then launched into a repudiation of Trump, repeating a line she first used last week labeling him as "temperamentally unfit" to serve in office.

Her scathing attacks on Trump came just an hour after the real estate mogul delivered similar remarks about her at a press conference also in New York.

“It’s clear that Donald Trump does not believe we’re stronger together,” Clinton said. “He has abused his primary opponents and their families, attacked the press for asking tough questions, denigrated Muslims and immigrants. He wants to win by stoking fear and rubbing salt in wounds and reminding us daily just how great he is. We believe we should lift each other up, not tear each other down.”

All eyes are now on Sanders’s next move and if he’ll remain in the race after Tuesday’s contests. His campaign sent out a statement following Clinton’s speech that he will hold a rally in Washington, D.C., one week ahead of the final primary contest.

He has yet to indicate whether he’ll give Clinton a full-throated endorsement, but has said he’ll do everything in his power to prevent Republicans from capturing the White House.

Sanders has suggested that she’ll have to work hard to court his supporters, but she’s expressed confidence that she’ll have no problem uniting them ahead of the general election season.

“Whether Democrat, Republican or Independent ... I hope you will join us,” Clinton said Tuesday. “Our campaign will take this message to every corner of this country.”