Clinton releases one-word statement on failed gun votes
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In a one-word statement, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonMatt Gaetz ahead of Mueller hearing: 'We are going to reelect the president' What to expect when Mueller testifies: Not much McConnell challenger faces tougher path after rocky launch MORE blasted Senate Republicans for voting down a Democratic-backed gun control measure to prevent suspected terrorists from purchasing firearms in the wake of the mass shooting in Orlando on June 12.

“Enough,” the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee's campaign wrote in a statement following the Monday night Senate votes. It also listed the names and ages of the 49 people killed at Pulse, the gay nightclub where the shooting took place. 

The Senate rejected four separate gun control measures Monday evening: two that dealt with background checks and two that sought to prevent people on terrorist watchlists from buying guns. All four were expected to fail.

The pinnacle vote was on a measure sponsored by Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) that would have prohibited people on terrorist watchlists from buying guns or explosives. It failed 47-53. Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (N.D.) was the only Democrat to vote against it.

Only two Republicans backed Feinstein’s amendment: Sens. Mark Kirk (Ill.) and Kelly Ayotte (N.H.), who are both vulnerable GOP incumbents facing tough reelection races.

Connecticut Sen. Chris Murphy (D), who waged a filibuster on the floor last week focused on the Feinstein measure, offered a separate amendment to expand background checks to include private sellers of firearms. It also failed to reach 60 votes.

Democratic Sens. Joe Manchin (W.Va.), Jon Tester (Mont.) and Heitkamp voted against moving forward with the proposal. Kirk supported it.

Following the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history, Clinton has repeatedly called for banning suspected terrorists from buying firearms.

“Surely we can agree if the FBI is watching you for suspected terrorist links, you shouldn’t be able to buy a gun with no questions asked," she said last week during a national security discussion in Hampton, Va.