A strong majority of Democrats would cancel the 2016 presidential election between Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonClinton trolls Trump with mock letter from JFK to Khrushchev Trump-Graham relationship tested by week of public sparring Sunday shows — Mulvaney seeks to tamp down firestorm over quid pro quo comments, Doral decision MORE and Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpZuckerberg launches public defense of Facebook as attacks mount Trump leaning toward keeping a couple hundred troops in eastern Syria: report Warren says making Israel aid conditional on settlement building is 'on the table' MORE if it meant President Obama could serve another term, a new poll found.

ADVERTISEMENT

Data provided to The Hill by the conservative polling outlet WPA Research found that 67 percent of Democrats would take a third term for Obama over a potential Clinton administration.

Only 28 percent said they’re ready to move on from the Obama White House, while 6 percent are undecided.

Obama is enjoying a surprisingly strong approval rating for a president serving out the final months of his second term.

A Washington Post-ABC News survey released this week found Obama’s net approval rating approaching 80 points in positive territory among Democrats. Former President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonHouse Democrat pledges 'there will be open hearings' in impeachment inquiry Democrats dig in ahead of Supreme Court ruling on 'Dreamers' Even with likely Trump impeachment, Democrats face uphill climb to win presidency MORE was at about 60 points positive within his own party at this point in 2000, while former President George W. Bush was under 40 with Republicans.

At the same time, a Gallup survey from April found Clinton’s net approval rating among Democrats hitting a new low. She had a 63-point net positive approval rating last November. That plummeted to only 36 points in April.

“The results should give pause to the Hillary Clinton campaign as Democratic respondents clearly prefer the status quo to a Clinton presidency,” a memo from WPA said.

Clinton is looking to unite Democrats behind her campaign after a bitterly fought primary against Bernie SandersBernie SandersWarren says making Israel aid conditional on settlement building is 'on the table' Warren says she will unveil plan to finance 'Medicare for All' Ocasio-Cortez says endorsing Sanders early is 'the most authentic decision' she could make MORE.

There was good news for Clinton on this front in The Washington Post survey released this week, which found Sanders supporters moving quickly behind Clinton over Trump.

The WPA survey of 384 registered Democrats was conducted between June 22 and 27 and has a margin of error of 5 percentage points.