Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioHillicon Valley: Lawmakers worry as 'deepfakes' spread | New intel strategy sees threats from emerging tech | Google fined M under EU data rules | WhatsApp moves to curb misinformation Tlaib: 'Right wing media is now targeting my little sister' Airbnb is doing the Democrats' dirty work MORE (R-Fla.) and the heads of the National Republican Senatorial Committee joined Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSinkhole opens up a block away from White House Civil rights group marks MLK Day with call for 'Trump card' national ID Pressure mounts for Trump to reconsider Syria withdrawal MORE (R-Ky.) in his filibuster against confirming John Brennan to head the Central Intelligence Agency, a move that could have political benefits for all involved.

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Rubio has been carefully crafting one of the most conservative voting records in the Senate — one that closely mirrors Paul's.

Many have speculated that is partly aimed at ensuring there's no daylight between the two in case they both decide to run for president in 2016, giving Rubio equal claim to the Tea Party mantle. 

It also gives the Florida Republican another line of attack on President Obama — this time on foreign policy, an area he's increasingly focused on since he joined the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

The involvement of Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzGroup aiming to draft Beto O’Rourke unveils first 2020 video Howard Dean looking for a 'younger, newer' Democratic nominee in 2020 Congress can stop the war on science MORE (R-Texas) in the filibuster, and later of NRSC Chairman Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranOn The Money: Shutdown Day 26 | Pelosi calls on Trump to delay State of the Union | Cites 'security concerns' | DHS chief says they can handle security | Waters lays out agenda | Senate rejects effort to block Trump on Russia sanctions Senate rejects effort to block Trump on Russia sanctions Overnight Defense: Trump faces blowback over report he discussed leaving NATO | Pentagon extends mission on border | Senate advances measure bucking Trump on Russia sanctions MORE (R-Kansas), gives the two another chance to attack Obama as well. It also allows Moran to bolster his conservative credentials. Cruz serves as vice chairman of the NRSC, along with Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanUSDA to recall more than 9,000 furloughed workers to provide farm aid Senate Dem introduces 'Stop Stupidity' act to end government shutdowns Senators look for possible way to end shutdown MORE (R-Ohio).

Cruz is no surprise. He has a strong constitutionalist Tea Party streak, and he was the second to join Paul, after fellow Tea Party Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeHillicon Valley: Trump AG pick signals new scrutiny on tech giants | Wireless providers in new privacy storm | SEC brings charges in agency hack | Facebook to invest 0M in local news AG pick Barr wants closer scrutiny of Silicon Valley 'behemoths' Grassroots political participation is under attack in Utah and GOP is fighting back MORE (R-Utah).  But Moran, who is viewed as more of an establishment conservative, needs to build trust with the Tea Party as he tries to guide the NRSC's involvement in potentially contentious primaries.

Tea Party groups are already rallying to the cause. The conservative group FreedomWorks issued a statement Wednesday afternoon calling for other senators to "Stand with Rand."

The NRSC also tweeted support of the filibuster, asking followers to "stand with us.

Paul is fighting the nomination because of Brennan's hand in the drone program and the Obama administration's refusal to completely rule out drone strikes on U.S. civilians on American soil. The fight has inflamed civil libertarians in both parties, including elements of the Tea Party.

Paul promised during the filibuster to continue it for "as long as it takes, until the alarm is sounded from coast to coast that our Constitution is important, that your rights to trial by jury are precious, that no American should be killed by a drone on American soil without first being charged with a crime, without first being found to be guilty by a court."


The support of other Republicans has the potential to boost Paul's political standing. 

One of his biggest political hurdles, should he run for the presidency, is appealing to mainstream conservatives wary of his libertarian foreign policy streak. The backing of his Senate Tea Party compatriots (and others) on this high-profile filibuster could help him do just that.

Others involved, like Lee, Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) and retiring Sen. Saxby ChamblissClarence (Saxby) Saxby ChamblissOssoff tests waters for Georgia Senate run CIA's ‘surveillance state’ is operating against us all Juan Williams: GOP plays the bigotry card in midterms MORE (R-Ga.), and Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenSenate Dems introduce bill to keep DACA info private Congress should elevate those trapped in the gap – support ELEVATE Act IRS shutdown plan fails to quell worries MORE (D-Ore.), the lone Democrat involved, seem to have little obvious political motivation for joining Paul. 

Toomey is another Tea Party favorite, while Wyden has been a strong critic of the drone program that Brennan has helped develop.