Most Trump fans in NC say election rigged if Clinton wins

Nearly 7 in 10 voters backing Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpBusiness school deans call for lifting country-specific visa caps Bolton told ex-Trump aide to call White House lawyers about Ukraine pressure campaign: report Federal prosecutors in New York examining Giuliani business dealings with Ukraine: report MORE in North Carolina believe the presidential election will have been rigged against him if he loses, according to a new poll.

Sixty-nine percent said the race will have been fixed should Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSaagar Enjeti: Tuesday's Democratic debate already 'rigged' against Gabbard, Sanders Ilhan Omar raises .1 million in third quarter Bloomberg rethinking running for president: report MORE win in the Public Policy Polling (PPP) survey released Tuesday.

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Sixteen percent said if Clinton wins it will be because she legitimately earned more votes than Trump, the GOP’s presidential nominee.

Forty percent, meanwhile, said the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) will tilt the election in Clinton’s favor despite the fact the organization no longer exists.

Pollsters next found that 41 percent agreed with Trump’s statement last week that Clinton is “the devil,” contrasted with 42 percent who disagreed and 17 percent who were unsure.

Tuesday’s results also showed that 47 percent believed they witnessed footage of Iran collecting $400 million from the U.S.

Forty-six percent said they had not seen the video, which Trump seemingly admitted he had not actually viewed last Friday.

Forty-eight percent of Trump’s supporters in North Carolina additionally blamed Clinton and President Obama for Capt. Humayun Khan’s death in 2004, even though Obama was an Illinois legislator and Clinton was a senator at the time.

Thirty-nine percent viewed the U.S. Muslim soldier’s parents negatively after his father, Khizr Khan, criticized Trump at last month’s Democratic National Convention.

Thirty-nine percent viewed the Khan family negatively after the feud, while 11 percent had a positive opinion instead.

PPP conducted its latest sampling of 830 voters in North Carolina via landline telephone and online interviews from August 5 to 7. It has a 3.4 margin of error of percentage points.