Trump's new agriculture brain trust includes Rick Perry, Jim Gilmore
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Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: 'I will not let Iran have nuclear weapons' Rocket attack hits Baghdad's Green Zone amid escalating tensions: reports Buttigieg on Trump tweets: 'I don't care' MORE announced his new agricultural advisory committee on Tuesday as he looks to improve his standing with voters, especially in rural swing states. 
 
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The roster includes six conservative governors — Terry Branstad (Iowa), Sam Brownback (Kan.), Pete Ricketts (Neb.), Mary Fallin (Okla.), Dennis Daugaard (S.D.), and Jack Dalrymple (N.D.) — as well as 2016 GOP primary rivals Rick Perry and Jim Gilmore. 
 
Five federal lawmakers — Sen. Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Tough questions await Trump immigration plan Pat Robertson: Alabama 'has gone too far' with 'extreme' abortion law Pat Robertson on if Equality Act passes: The land will 'vomit you out' MORE (Kan.) and Reps. Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteTop Republican releases full transcript of Bruce Ohr interview It’s time for Congress to pass an anti-cruelty statute DOJ opinion will help protect kids from dangers of online gambling MORE (Va.), Mike Conaway (Texas), Rodney Davis (Ill.) and Robert AderholtRobert Brown AderholtDems advance bill defying Trump State Department cuts Maryland raises legal tobacco purchasing age to 21 Anti-smoking advocates question industry motives for backing higher purchasing age MORE (Ala.) — will also sit on the committee, which includes former U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary John Block, former Harris Teeter grocery store CEO Bob Goodale, and other industry leaders. 
 
“The members of my agricultural advisory committee represent the best that America can offer to help serve agricultural communities," Trump, the Republican presidential nominee, said in a campaign statement. 
 
"Many of these officials have been elected by their communities to solve the issues that impact our rural areas every day. I’m very proud to stand with these men and women, and look forward to serving those who serve all Americans from the White House.”
 
The announcement comes the week after a series of swing-state polls painted a gloomy picture for Trump, especially in states where he expects to perform well among rural voters. Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonDe Blasio pitches himself as tough New Yorker who can take on 'Don the con' From dive bars to steakhouses: How Iowa caucus staffers blow off steam Warren policy ideas show signs of paying off MORE leads him by about 9 points in Pennsylvania and 3 points in Ohio, according to the RealClearPolitics average of recent polls, while the two are effectively tied in Iowa. 
 
This post was updated at 12 p.m.