Trump's new agriculture brain trust includes Rick Perry, Jim Gilmore
© GETTY IMAGES
Donald TrumpDonald TrumpBiden to hold virtual bilateral meeting with Mexican president More than 300 charged in connection to Capitol riot Trump Jr.: There are 'plenty' of GOP incumbents who should be challenged MORE announced his new agricultural advisory committee on Tuesday as he looks to improve his standing with voters, especially in rural swing states. 
 
ADVERTISEMENT
The roster includes six conservative governors — Terry Branstad (Iowa), Sam Brownback (Kan.), Pete Ricketts (Neb.), Mary Fallin (Okla.), Dennis Daugaard (S.D.), and Jack Dalrymple (N.D.) — as well as 2016 GOP primary rivals Rick Perry and Jim Gilmore. 
 
Five federal lawmakers — Sen. Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsPat Roberts joins lobbying firm weeks after Senate retirement Senate swears-in six new lawmakers as 117th Congress convenes Window quickly closing for big coronavirus deal MORE (Kan.) and Reps. Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteBottom line No documents? Hoping for legalization? Be wary of Joe Biden Press: Trump's final presidential pardon: himself MORE (Va.), Mike Conaway (Texas), Rodney Davis (Ill.) and Robert AderholtRobert Brown AderholtMo Brooks expresses interest in running for Shelby's Senate seat Shelby won't run for reelection Will Biden continue NASA's Artemis program to return to the moon? MORE (Ala.) — will also sit on the committee, which includes former U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary John Block, former Harris Teeter grocery store CEO Bob Goodale, and other industry leaders. 
 
“The members of my agricultural advisory committee represent the best that America can offer to help serve agricultural communities," Trump, the Republican presidential nominee, said in a campaign statement. 
 
"Many of these officials have been elected by their communities to solve the issues that impact our rural areas every day. I’m very proud to stand with these men and women, and look forward to serving those who serve all Americans from the White House.”
 
The announcement comes the week after a series of swing-state polls painted a gloomy picture for Trump, especially in states where he expects to perform well among rural voters. Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonMedia circles wagons for conspiracy theorist Neera Tanden The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Senate ref axes minimum wage, House votes today on relief bill Democratic strategists start women-run media consulting firm MORE leads him by about 9 points in Pennsylvania and 3 points in Ohio, according to the RealClearPolitics average of recent polls, while the two are effectively tied in Iowa. 
 
This post was updated at 12 p.m.