Clinton up by 10 points in new national poll
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Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonClinton and Ocasio-Cortez joke about Kushner's alleged use of WhatsApp Hillicon Valley: Kushner accused of using WhatsApp, personal email for official work | White House rejects request for Trump-Putin communications | Facebook left 'hundreds of millions' of passwords unsecured | Tech pressured to root out extremism Man accused of mailing pipe bombs to Dems pleads guilty MORE leads Republican rival Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpClinton and Ocasio-Cortez joke about Kushner's alleged use of WhatsApp Missouri Gov. declares state of emergency amid severe flooding Swalwell on Hicks testimony: 'She's going to have to tell us who she lied for' in Trump admin MORE by 10 points in a national poll released Thursday.

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Clinton leads Trump, 51 percent to 41 percent among likely voters, in a two-way race, according to the Quinnipiac University poll.

Clinton leads Trump by 7 points, 45 percent to 38 percent, when third-party candidates are factored in. Libertarian Party nominee Gary JohnsonGary Earl JohnsonPotential GOP primary challenger: Trump's 'contempt for the American people' behind possible bid The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Trump escalates border fight with emergency declaration Former Mass. governor takes step toward Trump primary challenge MORE has 10 percent support in that scenario while Green Party nominee Jill Stein has 4 percent.

The poll finds Trump with 29 percent support among millennials between the ages of 18 and 34, and 15 percent support among nonwhites.

The Republican nominee leads Clinton among white men, 59 percent to 32 percent, and voters who are 50 years of age and older.

Clinton, however, has the support of women, 60 percent to 36 percent, and those younger than 50.

More than half of the likely voters surveyed, 53 percent, said they had "strongly unfavorable" views of Trump, while 46 percent said the same about Clinton.

When asked if they thought that Trump and Clinton took responsibility for their mistakes, only 32 percent of respondents answered "yes" for each candidate.

Quinnipiac surveyed 1,498 likely voters between Aug. 18–24. The poll has a 2.5 percentage point margin of error.

Nikita Vladimirov contributed to this report, which was updated at 1:03 p.m.