Indiana Gov. Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceBrunson release spotlights the rot in Turkish politics and judiciary Scrap the Third Communique with China, keep the Six Assurances to Taiwan US must encourage world action to end genocide in Burma MORE on Sunday criticized Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonCarter Page files defamation lawsuit against DNC Dems fear party is headed to gutter from Avenatti’s sledgehammer approach Election Countdown: Cruz, O'Rourke fight at pivotal point | Ryan hitting the trail for vulnerable Republicans | Poll shows Biden leading Dem 2020 field | Arizona Senate debate tonight MORE for her attacks linking Republican nominee Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpKey takeaways from the Arizona Senate debate Major Hollywood talent firm considering rejecting Saudi investment money: report Mattis says he thought 'nothing at all' about Trump saying he may leave administration MORE with the alt-right movement.

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"I think Sen. [Tim] Kaine's [D-Va.] comments, Hillary Clinton's comments on Thursday night sound desperate to me," Pence, Trump's running mate, said on CNN's "State of the Union."
 
"The fact that you see Democrats and Hillary Clinton and her running mate rolling out the same old playbook of racial divisiveness sounds a little bit to me like an act of desperation."
 
Clinton gave a speech last week that tied Trump to the alt-right movement, a sect of hardcore conservatism often associated with white nationalism.
 
Last week, Kaine, Clinton's running mate, tied Trump's values to those of the Ku Klux Klan, saying the GOP nominee's values are not American values.
  
"The American people are sick and tired of politicians who seek to divide the people of this country to unite their supporters," Pence said Sunday.
 
Pence said he thinks Clinton was calling millions of Americans around the country "who believe we can make America great again, who believe that Hillary Clinton and Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaChance the Rapper works as Lyft driver to raise money for Chicago schools Americans are safer from terrorism, but new threats are arising Donald Trump Jr. emerges as GOP fundraising force MORE's policies have weakened America's place in the world and stifled America's economy — she's put some sort of racist intention on those Americans.
 
"I think that's deeply offensive," Pence said.
 
"The American people see right through it these days," he continued, before praising Trump as a candidate who is reaching out and speaking "boldly," particularly to African-American and Hispanic voters.