Clinton camp: Trump's immigration address his 'darkest speech'
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Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillicon Valley: Bolton tells Russians 2016 meddling had little effect | Facebook eyes major cyber firm | Saudi site gets hacked | Softbank in spotlight over Saudi money | YouTube fights EU 'meme ban' proposal Dems lower expectations for 'blue wave' Election Countdown: Takeaways from heated Florida governor's debate | DNC chief pushes back on 'blue wave' talk | Manchin faces progressive backlash | Trump heads to Houston rally | Obama in Las Vegas | Signs of huge midterm turnout MORE’s presidential campaign says Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump to fundraise for 3 Republicans running for open seats: report Trump to nominate former Monsanto exec to top Interior position White House aides hadn’t heard of Trump's new tax cut: report MORE hit a new low with his highly anticipated immigration address. 

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“In his darkest speech yet, Donald Trump doubled down on his anti-immigrant rhetoric and attempted to divide communities by pitting people against each other and demonizing immigrants,” Lorella Praeli, the Clinton campaign’s national Hispanic vote director, said in a statement early Thursday.

“Donald Trump once again showed us that he will continue his decades-long record of divisiveness and campaign of hate by pledging to forcibly remove every single undocumented immigrant from our country,” she said of the Republican presidential nominee.

“He showed us, very clearly, what’s at stake in this election by painting a picture of his idea of America: One in which immigrants are not welcomed and one in which innocent families are torn apart.”

Trump late Wednesday ended speculation that he might moderate his position on the issue. He detailed a 10-point immigration strategy in Phoenix, Ariz., reaffirming many of his hard-line stances on the topic.

Trump vowed he would build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, for example, and insisted no illegal immigrants would be exempt from deportation.

“As with any law enforcement activity, we will set priorities,” he said. "But unlike this administration, no one will be immune or exempt from enforcement. Anyone who has entered the United States illegally is subject to deportation. That is what it means to have laws and to have a country. Otherwise we don’t have a country.”

Trump additionally accused Clinton, the Democratic presidential nominee, of putting the needs of illegal immigrants before those of United States citizens.