Media doesn’t ask Clinton about emails

Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonVirginia governor's race poses crucial test for GOP Hillary Clinton backs Shontel Brown in Ohio congressional race Hillary Clinton: Casting doubt on 2020 election is 'doing Putin's work' MORE was never asked about her controversial private email server or her family's foundation during her first formal press conference in 278 days on Thursday.

Clinton, the Democratic presidential nominee, addressed reporters on the tarmac in White Plains, N.Y., on a podium in front of her airplane.

ADVERTISEMENT

She was asked six questions over 15 minutes about the tightening polls in the presidential race and whether she believed she was being treated differently in the race because she is a woman.

Clinton was also asked about Donald TrumpDonald TrumpChinese apps could face subpoenas, bans under Biden executive order: report Kim says North Korea needs to be 'prepared' for 'confrontation' with US Ex-Colorado GOP chair accused of stealing more than 0K from pro-Trump PAC MORE’s comments the night before on foreign policy. Clinton and Trump, the Republican presidential nominee, appeared Wednesday night at a military and veterans forum broadcast on MSNBC, where Clinton was asked about the private email server she used as secretary of State.

She held a press event on her plane Monday and has appeared for various interviews during the campaign with journalists. But the tarmac appearance was the first event with the normal trappings of a press conference in months.

The media has been pressing Clinton to hold a full press conference to give reporters a chance to ask her about a host of issues.

Since Clinton last gave a full press conference, the FBI decided not to bring charges against her for her handling of classified information over her private email setup.

New stories have also emerged about the Clinton Foundation and its donors and whether they won special access to the secretary of State in exchange for sizable donations.

Clinton on Wednesday night repeated that the Department of Justice found no evidence that her email had been hacked and that she did not knowingly send classified information over her private email.

On Friday, fresh questions were raised about Clinton's judgment and handling of classified information after the FBI released notes from the three-and-a-half-hour interview held with the former secretary of State in July.
 
The notes showed that an unnamed computer specialist wiped emails from Clinton's private server even after Congress had requested that all documents be preserved. The FBI documents also indicated that Clinton used 13 mobile devices and, in more than one instance, an aide destroyed her smartphone with a hammer.