Axelrod: Dean ‘nuts’ for linking cocaine, Trump
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David Axelrod, a former top adviser to President Obama, says Howard Dean went too far when he implied during Monday's presidential debate that Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpSanders apologizes to Biden for supporter's op-ed Jayapal: 'We will end up with another Trump' if the US doesn't elect progressive Democrats: McConnell impeachment trial rules a 'cover up,' 'national disgrace' MORE might be using cocaine.

Dean on Monday mentioned cocaine in a tweet discussing the GOP nominee's repeated sniffling.

Dean doubled down on his insinuation Tuesday, however, arguing Trump’s behavior was consistent with cocaine use.

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“That is actually a signature of people who use cocaine,” said Dean, a doctor and former Democratic presidential candidate.

“I’m not suggesting that Trump does, but I’m suggesting we think about it, because here’s the interesting constellation — he sniffs during the presentation, which is something that users do,” he added.

“[Trump] also has grandiosity, which is something that accompanies that problem…It’s something I think it’d be interesting to ask him and see if he ever had a problem with that.”

MSNBC host Kate Snow pushed back against Dean’s assertions, questioning how they differ from unfounded innuendo about Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonDemocratic debates are magnet for lobbyists NYT editorial board endorses Warren, Klobuchar for Democratic nomination for president Sanders v. Warren is just for insiders MORE’s health.

“But I don’t think this is a ridiculous idea,” he responded. "Something funny was going on with Trump last night. Do I think it’s cocaine — probably not.

“But again — the sniffing, the grandiosity, the delusions, the pressured speech — this guy has already proven himself to be unstable, the question is why is he unstable,” Dean said.

“I think it’s unlikely that you could mount a presidential campaign at 70 years old with a cocaine habit, but it was pretty striking.”

Trump audibly sniffled during his clash with his Democratic rival at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y.

More than 80 million people watched the contest, the first of three between the candidates.