The Republican National Committee claimed Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael Kaine'I saw my life flash before my eyes': An oral history of the Capitol attack 7 surprise moments from a tumultuous year in politics Robert E. Lee statue removed from US Capitol MORE interrupted Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceFeds walk back claim that Capitol rioters sought 'to capture and assassinate' officials Trump tells aides to never mention Nixon after comparisons McConnell about to school Trump on political power for the last time MORE and the moderator over 70 times during Tuesday’s vice presidential debate.

Shortly after the debate ended, the RNC made a quick note of Kaine’s aggressive style in an email to reporters.

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The email simply included a pair of tweets from reporters, citing specific voters being turned off by the Democratic vice presidential nominee's style.

“Undecided voter in Ohio says, 'Kaine came off like a jerk' tonight. Adds that he 'reinforced' some of the negatives about Clinton,” read one tweet from CNN’s Dan Merica.

In a separate statement, RNC Chairman Reince Priebus described Kaine as having “desperately flailed away with empty platitudes and constant interruptions.”

Throughout Tuesday’s debate, Kaine did repeatedly interject, drawing the attention of many debate watchers on social media.

And outside analysis confirms that Kaine did push harder to interject. Analysis from FiveThirtyEight found that Kaine interrupted over 70 times, compared to just over 40 interruptions for Pence.

In the first presidential debate, Donald TrumpDonald TrumpCIA chief threatened to resign over push to install Trump loyalist as deputy: report Azar in departure letter says Capitol riot threatens to 'tarnish' administration's accomplishments Justice Dept. argues Trump should get immunity from rape accuser's lawsuit MORE’s repeated interruptions of Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonMillennials and the great reckoning on race Biden chooses Amanda Gorman as youngest known inaugural poet Can Biden encompass the opposition he embodied? MORE became a conversation point.