House Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanWisconsin GOP quietly prepares Ron Johnson backup plans RealClearPolitics reporter says Freedom Caucus shows how much GOP changed under Trump Juan Williams: Biden's child tax credit is a game-changer MORE rebuked Republican presidential nominee Donald TrumpDonald TrumpSenators introduce bipartisan infrastructure bill in rare Sunday session Gosar's siblings pen op-ed urging for his resignation: 'You are immune to shame' Sunday shows - Delta variant, infrastructure dominate MORE for his past sexually explicit comments and said the GOP nominee will no longer attend a joint appearance the two had planned Saturday in Wisconsin.

“I am sickened by what I heard today,” Ryan said in a statement released Friday night. “Women are to be championed and revered, not objectified. I hope Mr. Trump treats this situation with the seriousness it deserves and works to demonstrate to the country that he has greater respect for women than this clip suggests. In the meantime, he is no longer attending tomorrow’s event in Wisconsin.”

Republicans had planned a day of unity in a key battleground state ahead of Sunday night’s pivotal debate.

Ryan, who has long had an uneasy relationship with Trump, was scheduled to make his first joint appearance with the nomine at the annual Wisconsin Fall Fest in Elkhorn.

Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonWisconsin GOP quietly prepares Ron Johnson backup plans Biden's bipartisan deal faces Senate gauntlet Trump urged DOJ officials to call election corrupt 'and leave the rest to me' MORE (R-Wis.), who is perhaps the most vulnerable Republican up for reelection, Gov. Scott Walker, and Brad Courtney, the state GOP chairman, were also slated to be on hand.

Both Johnson and Walker also criticized Trump's remarks.

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“Donald Trump’s recent comments are completely indefensible and I refuse to even attempt to try and do so,” Johnson said in a statement. 

The campaign said Trump will stay in New York City for debate preparation with Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, and Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsWant to evaluate Donald Trump's judgment? Listen to Donald Trump Democrat stalls Biden's border nominee Garland strikes down Trump-era immigration court rule, empowering judges to pause cases MORE (R-Ala.)

Trump’s campaign has been cast into crisis mode as it seeks to contain blowback from explosive audio and video, recorded in 2005, in which the GOP nominee is caught making lewd comments about women he hoped to have sex with.

Priebus is apparently sticking by Trump, but ripped him in a statement.

"No woman should ever be described in these terms or talked about in this manner. Ever,” Priebus said.

Vulnerable Republicans are scrambling to rebuke their nominee, with Sens. Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyottePoll: Potential Sununu-Hassan matchup in N.H. a dead heat  Democrats facing tough reelections back bipartisan infrastructure deal Sununu seen as top recruit in GOP bid to reclaim Senate MORE (R-N.H.), Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrSenate starts infrastructure debate amid 11th-hour drama The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - A huge win for Biden, centrist senators The 17 Republicans who voted to advance the Senate infrastructure bill MORE (R-N.C.) and Mark KirkMark Steven KirkDuckworth announces reelection bid Brave new world: Why we need a Senate Human Rights Commission  Senate majority battle snags Biden Cabinet hopefuls MORE (R-Ill.) releasing statements unloading on Trump.

Kirk called on Trump to drop out of the race, calling him a “malignant clown” that is “unfit” to be president.
    
In the leaked audio, discovered by The Washington Post, Trump is boasts about how easy it is to attract women as a famous person.

He said he tried to have sex with a married woman, ogled a female anchor on “Access Hollywood,” and talked about groping women.

“Grab them by the p---y,” Trump said. 

Trump later apologized for the "locker room banter" in the audio, but said that former President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonBipartisan infrastructure win shows Democrats must continue working across the aisle Overnight Health Care: CDC details Massachusetts outbreak that sparked mask update | White House says national vaccine mandate 'not under consideration at this time' Biden rolls dice by getting more aggressive on vaccines MORE "has said far worse to me on the golf course — not even close.”



"I apologize if anyone was offended," he added.