"We have nothing polite to say right now," the Sanders adviser said, CNN's Jeff Zeleny reported.
 
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Sanders, a self-described democratic socialist popular with millennials during the Democratic presidential primaries, had been working to help Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham Clinton2020 is not a family affair, for a change New York Democrat pens op-ed on why he opposes impeaching Trump Rob Zombie on canceling 'The Hunt': 'A bulls–-- sacrificial lamb that solves nothing in society' MORE win over young voters and was a vocal critic of Trump on the campaign trail.
 
"The truth is, if you look at Donald Trump's record, what you find is this guy is a pathological liar," Sanders said while stumping for Clinton in September. "I'm not talking about a little lie there, or stretching the truth here. I am talking about him coming up with things in his head that do not exist. There are psychological definitions there."
 
"It is trying to divide this country up," he said. "It is telling us that we are supposed to hate Muslims, we are supposed to hate Mexicans, if we are men we are supposed to hate women, we are supposed to hate anyone who is different than we are."
 
Just before the election, a tweet from Sanders read, "I hope we defeat Donald Trump and we defeat him badly." 
Despite his best efforts, ABC's exit poll data show that Clinton did not do as well among young voters as Obama in 2012, capturing a little more than half of the millennial vote.
 
Some observers have responded to the election results by lamenting that Sanders did not win the party's nomination, believing he could have defeated Trump. 
 
Sanders defeated Clinton in both the Wisconsin and Michigan primaries, two of the states where Trump pulled out surprise wins on Tuesday.