Third-party candidates on outside as debate criteria released
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The Commission on Presidential Debates has released the polls it will use to decide the participants of September's first presidential debate as third-party candidates struggle to make the stage.  

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Candidates will need to hit an average of 15 percent in polls conducted by ABC/Washington Post, CBS/New York Times, CNN/Opinion Research Corporation, Fox News, and NBC/Wall Street Journal. The 15 percent threshold had been announced months ago, but the commission released its polling selections on Monday after consultation with Frank Newport, the editor-in-chief of Gallup. 
 
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonPelosi on power in DC: 'You have to seize it' Cuba readies for life without Castro Chelsea Clinton: Pics of Trump getting vaccinated would help him 'claim credit' MORE and Republican nominee Donald TrumpDonald TrumpGraham: 'I could not disagree more' with Trump support of Afghanistan troop withdrawal GOP believes Democrats handing them winning 2022 campaign Former GOP operative installed as NSA top lawyer resigns MORE are virtually assured a slot each on the stage for the Sept. 26 debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y. But it remains unlikely that a third-party candidate will join them, despite voters' historic dislike of both Clinton and Trump. 
 
As of Monday, neither Libertarian Party nominee Gary JohnsonGary Earl JohnsonNew Mexico lawmakers send recreational marijuana bills to governor Judge throws out murder convictions, releases men jailed for 24 years On The Trail: Making sense of Super Poll Sunday MORE nor Green Party nominee Jill Stein would qualify, and neither has come close to hitting 15 percent in any qualifying poll. 
 
Johnson currently averages 9 percent in the three most recent qualifying polls, while Stein sits at just under 5 percent. In Fox's most recent poll, Johnson scored 12 percent, but the poll did not include Stein. CBS did not test either candidate in its most recent poll. 
 
A representative with the commission did not immediately respond to a request as to how the criteria would be applied if Fox and CBS continued not to test the whole field. 
 
A representative with the commission told The Hill that the polling averages only include the polls where a candidate is tested. So that means Johnson and Stein would not be penalized for polls they were not included in, outside of having fewer opportunities to raise their averages.