The map, if adopted, could also pose a problem for freshman Rep. Paul GosarPaul Anthony GosarRepublicans offer 'free market alternative' to paid family leave GOP lawmaker attacks critic as 'a little bitch' on Twitter Overnight Defense: NATO chief urges US to support alliance on its 70th anniversary | Turkey rebuffs Pentagon pressure over Russia deal | Rand Paul, liberals team up to push Trump on Syria withdrawal MORE (R-Ariz.), whose district becomes more competitive. Former Rep. Ann KirkpatrickAnn KirkpatrickDemocrats introduce bill to let 'Dreamers' work for Congress Push for ‘Medicare for all’ worries centrist Dems GOP compares Ocasio-Cortez to Trump MORE (D-Ariz.), who Gosar unseated in 2010, is running to take back the seat and has already demonstrated the ability to raise large amounts of money to take him on.

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The districts held by Democratic Reps. Gabrielle Giffords, Raul Grijalva and Ed PastorEdward (Ed) Lopez PastorWhich phone do lawmakers like the most? CAMPAIGN OVERNIGHT: Political tomfoolery Pastor endorses in race to replace him MORE are left largely unchanged or made slightly safer. Giffords won reelection by just two points in 2010, but is recovering from a gunshot wound inflicted by an gunman in January.

If Giffords runs again, she is widely expected to win reelection without serious challenge. If the seat opens up, it will be competitive.

"We are encouraged by the fact that the commission is leaning toward a competitive map. We think that is good in terms of electing more moderates," said Arizona Democratic Party spokesman Andy BarrGarland (Andy) Hale BarrOcasio-Cortez plans visit to Kentucky despite being disinvited by GOP colleague Ocasio-Cortez knocks Republican over Kentucky trip: 'GOP thought they could catch us with a bluff' Overnight Energy: Collins receives more donations from Texas oil, gas industry than from Maine residents | Interior chief left meetings off schedule | Omar controversy jeopardizes Ocasio-Cortez trip to coal mine MORE. "But we're not necessarily looking at this as any sort of guaranteed win."

Wasserman said Democrats were seeking to minimize the perception of their gains, lest the redistricting commission change the map before it is finalized after the public comment period.

"Democrats have every reason to downplay this map," he said. "I think it's going to generate a game of musical chairs."

Republicans blasted the map and accused the commission of abandoning its mandate to deliver an unbiased, balanced map.

"This gerrymandered map was drawn with an undeniable partisan purpose," Quayle said in a statement. 

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer (R) said she had been holding her tongue until now to give the commission room to work but vowed to formally weigh in on the map during the public comment period. 

"I'll be silent no longer," she said. "Arizona voters are owed a redistricting process that is lawful and transparent."

— This post was updated at 11:51 a.m.