Six of the eight House Republicans running for the Senate on Thursday voted against the budget deal from Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanWary GOP eyes Meadows shift from brick-thrower to dealmaker Budowsky: Why I back Kennedy, praise Markey Democratic super PAC quotes Reagan in anti-Trump ad set to air on Fox News: 'Are you better off?' MORE (R-Wis.) and Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayPelosi huddles with chairmen on surprise billing but deal elusive House approves two child care bills aimed at pandemic GOP, Democratic relief packages B apart on vaccine funding MORE (D-Wash.).

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Reps. Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonSunday shows preview: White House, congressional Democrats unable to breach stalemate over coronavirus relief The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the Air Line Pilots Association - Negotiators 'far apart' as talks yield little ahead of deadline Hillicon Valley: Facebook bans ads from pro-Trump PAC | Uber reports big drop in revenue | US offers M reward for election interference info MORE (R-Ark.) and Steve Daines (R-Mont.), top Republican Senate recruits who don't appear to face any threats in a primary, both voted against it, as did a trio of Georgia Republicans facing off in a crowded GOP primary: Reps. Paul BrounPaul Collins BrounHundreds apply to fill Isakson's Senate seat in Georgia Joe Lieberman's son running for Senate in Georgia California lawmaker's chief of staff resigns after indictment MORE, Phil GingreyJohn (Phil) Phillip GingreyEx-Tea Party lawmakers turn heads on K Street 2017's top health care stories, from ObamaCare to opioids Beating the drum on healthcare MORE and Jack Kingston.

Rep. Steve StockmanStephen (Steve) Ernest StockmanInmates break windows, set fires in riot at Kansas prison Wife of imprisoned former congressman cites COVID-19 risk in plea to Trump for husband's freedom Consequential GOP class of 1994 all but disappears MORE (R-Texas), who just announced a primary challenge to Sen. John CornynJohn CornynCOVID-19 bill limiting liability would strike the wrong balance From a Republican donor to Senate GOP: Remove marriage penalty or risk alienating voters Skepticism grows over Friday deadline for coronavirus deal MORE (R-Texas), also voted against the bill.

Voting against the deal could help the candidates with the conservative base and with the Tea Party groups that vocally opposed it.

The only Republicans running for the Senate who backed the budget bill were Rep. Bill Cassidy (R-La.), who is seeking to challenge Sen. Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuBottom line A decade of making a difference: Senate Caucus on Foster Youth Congress needs to work to combat the poverty, abuse and neglect issues that children face MORE (D-La.), and Rep. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoAnalysis finds record high number of woman versus woman congressional races Former VA staffer charged with giving seven patients fatal insulin doses Senate GOP hedges on attending Trump's convention amid coronavirus uptick MORE (R-W.Va.), running for an open seat.

The vast majority of House Republicans voted for the plan, handing a big win to both Ryan and Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerWary GOP eyes Meadows shift from brick-thrower to dealmaker Bottom line Cheney battle raises questions about House GOP's future MORE (R-Ohio).

The bill passed overwhelmingly, with 332 votes in favor, including 169 Republicans. Only 62 Republicans broke with party leaders and voted against it.

Daines, who's running for an open seat in Montana and is seen as closer to the establishment than the Tea Party, praised Ryan and Murray but said the deal relied too much on future cuts.

"While I'm encouraged by ongoing efforts to develop bipartisan proposals and commend Chairman Ryan and Chairman Murray for their work to find agreement, I am concerned that this budget proposal does not provide Montanans with a much-needed solution to our debt crisis," he said in a statement.

"Rather than taking serious and needed steps to address Washington's spending addiction and growing debt, this budget relies largely on spending cuts many years from now to offset immediate spending increases."

Cotton, a Tea Party favorite who is running against Sen. Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorCoronavirus poses risks for Trump in 2020 Tom Cotton's only Democratic rival quits race in Arkansas Medicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 MORE (D-Ark.), slammed the budget agreement.

"This budget deal busts the spending caps that took effect just months ago by spending billions now in exchange for supposed long-term spending cuts," he said in a statement. "Arkansans are tired of the Washington ‘long term,' which never seems to arrive."

Broun, a hard-charging conservative, was even more critical of the bill.

"Instead of taking the opportunity to enact meaningful spending reform, this deal spends an additional $63 billion over the next two years in exchange for the empty promise of spending cuts in the future — a budget gimmick which is all but certain to be cancelled before any real cuts come to fruition," he said in a statement.

"We must stop spending money we don’t have while kicking the tough decisions down the road."

Among Democrats running for the Senate, Reps. Gary Peters (D-Mich.) and Bruce BraleyBruce Lowell Braley2020 caucuses pose biggest challenge yet for Iowa's top pollster OPINION | Tax reform, not Trump-McConnell feuds, will make 2018 a win for GOP Ten years later, House Dems reunite and look forward MORE (D-Iowa) voted for the deal. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa (D-Hawaii), who is challenging Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) in a Democratic primary, was one of 32 Democrats to vote against it.