Six of the eight House Republicans running for the Senate on Thursday voted against the budget deal from Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanAmash: Trump incorrect in claiming Congress didn't subpoena Obama officials Democrats hit Scalia over LGBTQ rights Three-way clash set to dominate Democratic debate MORE (R-Wis.) and Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayDemocrats urge Rick Perry not to roll back lightbulb efficiency rules Biz groups say Warren labor plan would be disaster Freedom of the press under fire in Colorado MORE (D-Wash.).

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Reps. Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonHillicon Valley: GOP lawmakers offer election security measure | FTC Dem worries government is 'captured' by Big Tech | Lawmakers condemn Apple over Hong Kong censorship Lawmakers condemn Apple, Activision Blizzard over censorship of Hong Kong protesters Lawmakers set to host fundraisers focused on Nats' World Series trip MORE (R-Ark.) and Steve Daines (R-Mont.), top Republican Senate recruits who don't appear to face any threats in a primary, both voted against it, as did a trio of Georgia Republicans facing off in a crowded GOP primary: Reps. Paul BrounPaul Collins BrounJoe Lieberman's son running for Senate in Georgia California lawmaker's chief of staff resigns after indictment Republican candidates run against ghost of John Boehner MORE, Phil GingreyJohn (Phil) Phillip Gingrey2017's top health care stories, from ObamaCare to opioids Beating the drum on healthcare Former GOP chairman joins K Street MORE and Jack Kingston.

Rep. Steve StockmanStephen (Steve) Ernest StockmanConsequential GOP class of 1994 all but disappears Former aide sentenced for helping ex-congressman in fraud scheme Former congressman sentenced to 10 years in prison for campaign finance scheme MORE (R-Texas), who just announced a primary challenge to Sen. John CornynJohn CornynTrump slams 'very dumb' O'Rourke for proposals on guns, tax exempt status for churches GOP cautions Graham against hauling Biden before Senate Succession at DHS up in the air as Trump set to nominate new head MORE (R-Texas), also voted against the bill.

Voting against the deal could help the candidates with the conservative base and with the Tea Party groups that vocally opposed it.

The only Republicans running for the Senate who backed the budget bill were Rep. Bill Cassidy (R-La.), who is seeking to challenge Sen. Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuCongress needs to work to combat the poverty, abuse and neglect issues that children face Dems wrestle over how to vote on ‘Green New Deal’ Lobbying world MORE (D-La.), and Rep. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoGaetz: Some lawmakers reviewed transcript at White House On The Money: Trump takes aim at China in UN address | Consumer confidence fell as trade tensions rose | Senate proposes billion for Trump border wall Senate proposes billion for Trump border wall MORE (R-W.Va.), running for an open seat.

The vast majority of House Republicans voted for the plan, handing a big win to both Ryan and Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerIs Congress retrievable? Boehner reveals portrait done by George W. Bush Meadows to be replaced by Biggs as Freedom Caucus leader MORE (R-Ohio).

The bill passed overwhelmingly, with 332 votes in favor, including 169 Republicans. Only 62 Republicans broke with party leaders and voted against it.

Daines, who's running for an open seat in Montana and is seen as closer to the establishment than the Tea Party, praised Ryan and Murray but said the deal relied too much on future cuts.

"While I'm encouraged by ongoing efforts to develop bipartisan proposals and commend Chairman Ryan and Chairman Murray for their work to find agreement, I am concerned that this budget proposal does not provide Montanans with a much-needed solution to our debt crisis," he said in a statement.

"Rather than taking serious and needed steps to address Washington's spending addiction and growing debt, this budget relies largely on spending cuts many years from now to offset immediate spending increases."

Cotton, a Tea Party favorite who is running against Sen. Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (D-Ark.), slammed the budget agreement.

"This budget deal busts the spending caps that took effect just months ago by spending billions now in exchange for supposed long-term spending cuts," he said in a statement. "Arkansans are tired of the Washington ‘long term,' which never seems to arrive."

Broun, a hard-charging conservative, was even more critical of the bill.

"Instead of taking the opportunity to enact meaningful spending reform, this deal spends an additional $63 billion over the next two years in exchange for the empty promise of spending cuts in the future — a budget gimmick which is all but certain to be cancelled before any real cuts come to fruition," he said in a statement.

"We must stop spending money we don’t have while kicking the tough decisions down the road."

Among Democrats running for the Senate, Reps. Gary Peters (D-Mich.) and Bruce BraleyBruce Lowell Braley2020 caucuses pose biggest challenge yet for Iowa's top pollster OPINION | Tax reform, not Trump-McConnell feuds, will make 2018 a win for GOP Ten years later, House Dems reunite and look forward MORE (D-Iowa) voted for the deal. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa (D-Hawaii), who is challenging Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) in a Democratic primary, was one of 32 Democrats to vote against it.